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MANAGER'S REPORT 



There are several items of interest to KPFA subscribers this month. 

First, I would like to welcome two new staff members to the station: 
Tom Green, as KPFA's Promotion Director and Don Porsche, as our new 
Public Affairs Director. Actually, although 1 use the word "new", it isn't 
really correct. Let me explain. 

Tom Green is 26, holds a Masters degree in mathematics, and is an 
expert computer programmer on the side. But Tom isn't new to KPFA. 
He began volunteering regularly in Promotion and Subscription at the 
station about two years ago. His hard work, common sense, and good 
humor have been a delight to us since he walked up our stairs. We welcome 
him and know that you, our subscribers, will benefit tremendously from 
his presence on the staff. 

Don Porsche's name should be familiar to all of you. He was KPFA's 
New Director from May 1967 to March 1969. Although I wasn't aware of 
it, it turns out that Don was a classmate of mine at Columbia College, 
graduating in 1961 with a degree in German. Most recently, Don was 
a free-lance correspondent in Europe for the San Francisco CHRONICLE. 
His experience in the News Department at KPFA and his demonstrated 
rapport with volunteers should help in developing, even further, the 
strong news and public affairs side of KPFA's programming 

Both Tom Green and Don Porsche will be discussing their plans 
for the station in future issues of the FOLIO. 



I would also like to thank those of you who have taken the time 
to write to the Federal Communications Commission and Senator Pastore's 
Sub-committee, expressing your support for and interest in the continued 
well-being of KPFA. We have received copies of several score letters sent 
to public officials, and continue to be impressed by the intelligence and 
concern they show. 

LETTERS DO HELP. They indicate that, despite views to the 
contrary, KPFA and the Pacifica stations carry out a function in 
society not duplicated elsewhere and not easily (if at all) replaced - a 
function so valuable that hundreds of listeners are moved to express 
their interest and concern when its continuance is threatened. 

If you write, when you write, please send us copies of your 
correspondence. Thank you. 

Lastly, a reminder. KPFA will be twenty-one years old April 19. 



OJi VJZfimi^, 



KPFA PACIFICA 

1970 CHARTER FLIGHTS 

EUROPE and JAPAN WORLDS FAIR 



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Aug. 1 



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AMSTERDAM-OAKLAND June 14 S260 

AMSTERDAM-OAKLAND Sept. 2(> S260 
PAYMENT DATES: 

Flight 2 
Oakland-London 
First-payment S I I Opcr passenger, duc- 
hy November 15. 1969. 
Second paymerii v ~^ per passenger, 
due In January 15, 1970 
I in 1 1 payment v ~ ^ |xr passenger, not 
later than March 1, 1970. 

Flight < 
Oakland- Amsterdam 
Firsi payment SI I [I |\ r passenger, due 
bj Decemkt 15. 1969 
Second p.nmcm S~5 per passenger, 
due In April I. 197(1 
I in ll payment S"*> |scr passenger, not 
later than June I. I9 T (I 



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A MESSAGE FROM MARSHA BARTLETT 
KPFA'S SUBSCRIPTION REGISTRAR 

WE NEED THE DONATION OF AT LEAST 
TWO ELECTRIC TYPEWRITERS IN GOOD 
SHAPE WITH GOOD TYPE FACE FOR USE 
IN THE SUBSCRIPTION AND MUSIC 
OFFICES. CAN YOU HELP??? IF SO, 
PLEASE CALL ME AT 848-6767. 

THANK YOU 



KPFA IOI.IO... MARCH l<)7() 



Allan Michael Frankel 

Cincinnati - Rockdale Temple - Northstar Camp 

for boys - Oberlin College - cyclothymic 

personality - brown Judo belt - Lieutenant, 

USN (honorable discharge after 5 months) 

- leader of all-girls tours of Europe - 

member ADA (Amer. Dental Ass.) -- teaching 

ass't. & master's candidate, SF State - 

green car -- 34 years - 



47 ROSEMUND WAY 



"Asked how he came to name his Portrait of the Artist as a 
Young Dog and whether he had been influenced by James 
Joyce, he explained very quietly and with firmness that when 
he wrote the stories which comprise the volume, he had not 
read a word of Joyce." 



When I was five years old. I saw my dog, part Cocker 
and Beagle, emasculated before my eyes. Dr. Frizzie says this 
has no significance, but 1 think about it lots. Life is not a 
joyous occasion. 

Yesterday, the grass was making shadows and the 
salt foam nipped my toes. We were by the sea, putt-putting 
out on the orange and yellow, empty afternoon bus; in dull 
groups like the sand birds, we watched waves stand .on end and 
fall. The mucous sea slides in, and Nurse Sally stands with us, 
while Otgon, our attendant, gymnastically runs down the 
beach and back, cutting a darker line through the neon-day- 
light. Otgon is an Orangutan -- or at least he wants everyone to 
believe that he is an Orangutan - and a high ass has Nui^e Sally. 

My dog's name was Walter. Living the life of a Walter, 
he was, until he was deprived. For, in truth, the kiddies in my 
neighborhood - yes, my neighborhood -- were mean as butcher 
knives; though it was an old, rusty Boy Scout blade that did 
Walter in. Pulling it out Jerry says, "I think I'll cut off Walter's 
balls." Jerry had a knack for such things and, today, although 
I have seen him at his real estate business, I may still picture 
him mashing a gold fish with the ball of his tiny, nine year old 
shoe. So when he says goodbye Walter, and everybody dares 
him and calls him chicken, 1 myself, know he is really going to 
do it. And sure enough, Jerry takes a good hold, Swink!, and 
off they come. Walter, who has been holding still with the 
patience of an Abraham, screams like a movie air raid siren, 
taking off in pain and terror through the back yards and into 
the house, leaving a trail of blood through the kitchen and 
even on the walls. 

Walls. "Is there nothing that loves a wall." I think of 
that poem. Walls have more character - a lot of character - 
than we realize. There are cool walls and hot walls and jagged 
walls and falling walls. Around me, is the cool wall of ivy and 
cement turned in on the sun. 

In the house where I grew up, the walls were a tan, 
cool, plaster cream even in the hottest August days. Small, 
delicate garden spiders would come out of the registers and sit 
impassively on the cool walls, making thin shadows like ferris 
wheels and, possibly, inaudible, musing, sounds. 



Ackerman, John. Dylan Tfiomas, His Life and Work 
(Oxford University Press. 1964), page 105. 



My father was a doctor and president of the state 
medical society. My mother played cards: solitaire when she 
was alone and bridge two or three times a week with the girls. 
Walter and I would pass through sometimes and see overstuffed 
ladies gathered in frail, wood slat folding chairs around the 
little card tables, the candy dishes of papered chocolates and 
coated almonds and hard fruit jellies before them. The ash tray 
stuffed with butts. There was the riffle and smell of cards in the 
air. "Two clubs," "Three No," "I'll Buy," they would say. 

It was late Tuesday, and I was sitting in the garden as 
I do every afternoon -- crafts class, letter writing, gymnastics, 
Dr. Frizzie taking up my mornings - when the mail came. 
Otgon, grunting briefly, handed me a faint blue envelope from 
my brother's wife, Suzie, who manages to giggle even in print, 
and a strange, plain envelope of cheap quality. I had never 
gotten an envelope like this before. It was addressed 
OCCUPANT, 47 Rosemund Way. Not being especially 
enthused about giggles at the moment, I turned my attention 
to this envelope of mystery. It was heavy, or rather, thick, and 
full of important impersonality. But while I paused gazing at 
it the bell rang for dinner. Placing the envelope in my upper 
breast pocket, I went to eat and saved the pleasure of my little 
surprise for later. 

The dining room, half filled, was large and white and 
the food, what is called institutional. As I entered, I heard about 
me the unintelligible, but clearly audible, drone of a hive of bees 
and I ate my dinner mainly in silence. I will not bother to 
describe my fellow boarders. Those in my ward were quite a 
variety, proving as medical science has long known, that mental 
disease favors no class, race or religion. But on the whole, there 
was little difference between myself, or my actions, and most 
of the others. Although I must mention my red scarf. When I 
was a Junior in a small, Congregationalist college, I began 
wearing a red scarf around my neck, mainly as a gadfly, and I 
have worn a red scarf ever since, in doors and out, except for 
the hottest months when 1 was in New York. When people said, 
"What's the red scarf for?", I would say: it was my great grand- 
father's, the Bosnian Count and General. (I was prone to lie 
occasionally.) But my scarf does go quite decently with the 
inmate's white uniform and even in this plain dress, my slim but 
tall, blond body cuts a nice figure. 

After dinner, I turned down the long, rowed brick 
corridor -- green plastic sprouting in pots and tarnished penny 
plaque: "John Wessling Wing, 1953" -- to my small cubicle of 
a room. The walls were puke green and so small that 1 often 
felt that I was wearing the enclosure like a shirt. But tonight I 
took no notice of the walls and turned my attention immediatly 
to the unopened envelope. Flipping on the desk light, I forced 
my first finger underneath the flap and carefully pulled it open. 
Then, inverting the envelope, I gently shook out the contents 
on the desk top. It was a packet of small, glossed colored papers. 
The colors were brilliant and gay and I smelled them. They 
smelled like a brand new text book. I picked one of the papers 
up and began reading. It said in lipstick red letters, "Save 10i/ 
with this coupon on new COLD POWER", and at the bottom: 
"Good only on COLD POWER' and other use constitutes 
fraud." Another one showed a photograph of Mrs. Betty B. 
Miller of Memphis, Tennessee, and another one said, "We'll pay 
you 7</ to try the short cut way through ironing day". A bright 
yellow one posed questions in black letters: why are water based 
waxes dangerous on wood floors? what is the best all-purpose 
floor wax on the market today? why and how should I remove 
old layers of wax? There were pictures of detergents in turtle 
green boxes, a "proved oral antiseptic now in family size", and 
a show business blue rooster who could sing holding a box of 
cereal under each wing. 

I continued reading through them until near the end I 
came to a piece of paper that clearly out-sparkled all the rest. It 
shone with phosphorescent pinks and purples, oranges, and 
tomato reds and greens and in small gothic type all over the 

surface it said: contest, contest, contest, contest 

Turning the piece of paper over I read: "Grand Prize" "WIN" 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



"A surprise taste test of four of Europe's Greatest 
Restaurants and a dream trip for two to London, Paris, 
Rome and the Riviera (including round trip transport, 
hotels, meals, entertainment, sightseeing). You will fly 
TWA Star Stream jet PLUS free groceries for five years." 

'■Submit your entry blanks before May 19th, it 

concluded. 

A feeling of grandeur set my heart beating, and I walked 
over to my small, shuttered window and glimpsed a patch of 
cold nite sky. Specks of stars clung to black branches making 
vernal Christmas trees. Should 1 enter that contest? I thought. 
Images Hew through my head, I knew I could win it. But the 
time passed away before I realized, for my ponderings and 
dreams of Grand Prizes were abruptly interrupted by Nurse 
Sally who came in with her insufferable pill tray and gave me 
mine. Nurse Sally, despite a high ass and a face and figure that 
were decidedly young and pleasing, had the soul of a brand new 

Army Instruction Manual. "Here's your pill. Mr ", and 

handed me mine and the small paper cup of luke warm water 
which filtered down my throat like glue. Pivoting to my bed, 
she coolly ran back the covers. Only a prostitute or a nurse 
could develop that precise motion, I thought. "It's time for 
bed, Mr Have you been to the bathroom?" 

Before retiring, I carefully replaced the glossy pieces of 
paper in their envelope and carefully placed the envelope in my 
uniform pocket. Then, folded into the cool Creamy Whip sheets, 
lavendered in violet night, an oozy delirium slipped over me. And 
swarming phosphorescent pinks, tomato reds and oranges, 
mingled in a sky of jet liners over a nursery rhyme London. 
There was a patch of night sky like a swatch of cloth, and, 
ofcourse behind it all, the pale greenish hills and the friendly 
face of Walter. 

Walking back beside the wall on visiting day, Silvia, my 
third wife (we were together so short a time -- five months -- 
but I feel that we really got to know one another. I ask myself, 
is it possible to know someone in five months) -- Silvia, placing 
her hand as thin and pale as a pine root against her cheek said, 
"Rotten Cindy's getting out of prison." 

"Do you mean the watermelon eater?" I said. 

Rotten Cindy meant absolutely nothing to me or my life. 
And I should have forgotten her as quickly as Silvia mentioned 
her if it were not for the fact I had experienced her, a sickly, 
thin girl, eat an entire watermelon by herself, rind and all, in 
twenty-five minutes. She was stoned on acid at a Village party 
and thoroughly enjoyed it. The watermelon disappeared in 
great long slurps and slops -- first the red part, then the white, 
then the green. The rest of the people watched her and she said, 
"yes, yes", in between mouthfuls with the same fervor I had 
seen at a revival meeting in 1952, in a Holy Roller who had just 
been saved. When she was done, her stomach stuck out like a 
pregnant sow's. Possibly the watermelon had reconstituted 
itself within her; immobilized by this great bulk in her center, 
she lay on her back on the rug for four hours, a passive, pacific 
island in a sea of humanity. 

"Where will she go?" I fingered my red scarf. 

"Back to Zen'Eden, I guess," Silvia answered in her voice 
Hal as a nail. Silvia had the face of a momma doll, with pale, 
artificial color to her cheeks and Huffed hair and black eyes and 
black, long, regular eyelashes and lids that seemed to want to 
close. Her nose and mouth had a patent, doll-like precision, and 
her only non-mass-produced, brown, non-sUnnped-out part were 
some freckles thai splattered her nose. 

I thought ol tliose short days in New York and our short 
lives together. Silvia even now had brought the Parchesi board 
with her. When I had met hei al the gate she had brought it out 
from behind hoi hack and held it up for me to see. She knew I 
would respond, lor I loved to berate Silvia's childlike love of 
Parchesi. (She lelt most at home in the silent, amniotic world of 



Parchesi men.) Sometimes, especially in the late fall, we would 
stay in bed all day, get up, bathe, fix a fancy dinner with candles, 
and play Parchesi all night. One time I said, "Well Silvia, shall 
we screw all day and play Parchesi all night, or shall we screw 
all night and play Parchesi all day?" We ate a fancy dinner and 
went to a movie instead. 

"Look what I've got." She held up a torn out scrap of 
newspaper from a distance. 

"What's that? I'll bet it's a Dear Abby column?" 
"Don't worry, we're tired of Dear Abby columns." 
"Oh yes, I forgot to tell you. I may win a free trip to 
Europe." 

"Europe? They won't even let you out of this looney bin. 
Here read it." 

The paper Happed on my hand and I began to read: 

"Dr. R.L.Van de Castle of.. .was discussing the frequency with 
which certain animals appear in dreams. According to a head 
count that Dr. Van de Castle has made, the animals which pop 
up most commonly in dreams are dogs and horses. Dogs and 
horses are reported mainly by women dreamers, but the next 
most popular type of animal -- birds - largely populates the 
dreams of men. Dr. Van de Castle thought that dreams with a 
higher mammalian content might reflect psychological maturity. 
Children, for instance, have more dreams about insects than 
adults, and primitive people tend to dream less about the higher- 
animals, too. Dr. Van de Castle reported a poll of dream animals 
taken among the Yir Yoronts, who are Australian bushmen; it 
turned up 6 ducks, 5 turtles, 3 lizards, 1 flying fox, 1 crab, 
1 leech, 1 rat, 1 bush cat, 1 bull, 1 cow, and 1 bandicoot. "2 

I faked an authoritative scowl. "Yes, psychological 
maturity", I said. 

"You havn't told me a Walter dream for a long time," 
she coaxed. 

Next to Parchesi, Silvia had a strange fascination for ny 
Walter dreams. Tell me some more Walter dreams she would say, 
like a child saying 'tell me a story'. She seemed to enjoy having 
a fantastic scene set before her like a plate of oranges. 

"Tell me the one about Rose Kennedy," she said, 
assuming one of her dream listening poses, head cupped in hands. 

And so I told her the Rose Kennedy one again. I think 
when I was twenty, I was reading Lady Chatlerly's Lover and I 
dreamt that Rose Kennedy, the mother of a President, came to 
visit me. Carefully ushering her into a special room, we beheld a 
large trunk of jewels, -- diamonds, rubies, sapphires - and on top 
of this sparkling treasure trove, glowing itself, lay the newly-dead 
carcass of Walter and a paperbound copy of Lady Chatterly's 
Lover, opened in the middle, face down, to expose the blue and 
red and gold covers. 

"I like that one," she said. 

I smiled, and looking along the wall at the line of fir and 
nut trees, yellow with gaunt flats of sunlight, I saw once more a 
spring, cool, frail and clear, but burnished. I saw myself and my 
dog leave the brown house through fields, growing small to boys 
wrapped in checks behind stalks of condensed breath; and then, 
in the clear floor of the woods, dashing through^ touching fronds 
with our ribs, crushing the juice from leaves with our flying hard 
feet, until we are both so tired, panting, we lie down, our bellies 
on the cool April earth. I sec the pale April wind as gentle and 
intoxicating as a veil, a thin stream of wood smoke, and looking 
at the big, bright April sky, so blue and full of stuffed, puffy 
white clouds that moved imperceptibly, endlessly by, as long as 
I wished to look. 

At some time, a moment of idle chatlerless rectitude, I 
had decided, long ago, that dogs were not human. That I was 
human. Yes - that there was a difference to human beings, I said. 
Dogs may experience it all, I Said, but a dog is carefree and happy 
because a dog has no picture of (he coming attractions in death. 
I, or we, am, or are, going to die, I said. Yes, I said. 

2 "Di . Van de Castle Speaks", The San Francisco Examiner, 
August 3, 1967, page 12. 

KIM A FOLIO.. MARCH 1^70 



Dr. Fri/zie began: What is a Walter? 

And I: What is a Waller? Walter is a five letter word tliat 

spells a name. I mean, six letter. 

Dr. Frizzie: Well then, what does the name Walter mean? 

And I : Walter is a Saxon name meaning "lord or master 

of the wood." In Old English, it would by 
'Wealdhere\ 

(I was a sub-chaser for facts that grabbed my 
attention.) 

Dr. Frizzie, changing lacks: Let us just for a moment imagine 

that there was no Walter, that you are pretending, 
playing a game, that there never was a Walter. 
Wishing, perhaps, that I would play this game with 
you. Why, if you were pretending, making it up, do 
you think that you would want to do so? 



And 



But I'm not making it up. 1 say there was a Walter. 



Dr. Frizzie: Yes, perhaps Walter was a school friend, or some- 
one that you disliked 

And I : Walter was a dog and he was castrated, God Damn 

it. 

Th-ink, you must have known someone else by the 
name of Walter' 7 

It's my life and I know what happened in my own 
life. 

Your brother says that your family never owned 
a dog named Walter? 

I paused, breathing deeply, and suddenly felt a coolness, a calm- 
ness, like a doctor's cold stethescope on my temples. In a slow 
even voice I answered. 

Did it ever occur to you that my brother may be 
lying or that he was too young to remember? 

It was a telling point, a hard surgical cut, and 1 was out of danger. 
Slowly, ejaculating my show of triumph, I walked to the door. 
I firmly turned the knob. Then, standing half in the long, empty 
corridor and half in the room, I had one last thought: 

Walter's the only thing that makes sense in this 
shit-ass world, I shouted. 

My voice reverberated in the hollow corridor. 1 had nothing 
further to say, and I finished closing the door. 

Today is Wednesday and we are at the sea, tasting once 
again the salt and grit. The wind is a hurricane; I have never felt it 
so strong and the sun glints like a tin foil wrapper in the mist. I 
stand with the others, as usual, my red scarf pointing street-ward, 
feeling the strike of the wind in my face and nostrils. It is a blow 
to gale us off the beach. 

All of a sudden, we hear a strange, loud rattle and, 
looking up, above us, above our very heads, we see a woman at 
least eighteen feet tall, in the air, above our heads. She is flapping 
and rattling with a hard lipsticky smile upon her face and, 
obviously, is detached from her billboard in the strong wind 
because she is wearing a zebra bikini and, in one opened palm, 
she holds a brand new, maroon-plated Chevrolet. We scream in 
terror and our eyes squint and we run down the beach like 
haunted things with Otgon and Nurse Sally chasing after us. 



I begin to run with the others but I do-not wish to run 
and fall behind. There is something going through my mind, some- 
thing besides terror. It is a picture, a lighter, freer picture. I slow 
to a meditative walk. I know the war is on. It is a picture that 
every grammar school boy has seen. The teacher holds up the 
opened book and says, this is Simon Bolivar, liberator of 
Bolivia. He is on a charged, white horse in full uniform, sword 
circling, and the black and white photograph sky behind him. 
I think of other bygone heroes: General MacArthur, Terry 'n 
the Pirates against the Dragon Lady - and I know that I can not 
run. I know the war is finally on. I say it out loud, "The war is 
on", and turn around to face the amazon. 

But I have no weapon. Quickly, glancing about me at 
pebbles and half buried clam shells and a scurrying crab, I sec a 
huge piece of kelp, thick and long as an arm, lying on the higher 
beach, drying and mouldering. I pick it up, scattering a drove of 
sand flies, and my panic does not lessen. The blood pounds 
and thuds and I feel as though 1 may faint or gasp up blood; 
but I stand with my kelp staff clenched in both hands, chest 
high, and my feet digging into the beach, waiting. That song. 
What is it? 

Yes. That song: "Paper Doll...." How is it. I'm going to 
buy a Paper Doll that I can call my own." I had forgotten it: 

"I'm going to buy a Paper Doll." 

"I'm going to buy a Paper Doll." 
Joyfully I sing it. Consciously. Emphasizing my 
unconscious compulsion. 

"I'm going to buy a Paper Doll." 

"I'm going to buy a Paper Doll that 1 can call 

my own." 
And now the great she-monster swoops down in a great 
woosh and flap. 

"Paper Doll that I can call my own." 
and I swing out with my staff and hit her mightily in the face 
so that her mouth rips all the way across the smile and out of 
her face. 

"Paper Doll that 1 can call my own." 
She draws back for an instant in astonishment and pain. Her 
face is now hideous and distorted with rage. And then she is on 
me, swirls on me. I am snared, entrapped. I feel great Zebra 
clad breasts pressing against me. I swing out with my kelp club, 
slashing and lashing. I tear holes through her until my own force 
of swing throws the club from my hands and it hollowly thumps 
the wet sand. I swing my fists furiously but it is useless. I am 
surrounded, bound in a sea of paper. I struggle, screaming to 
free myself from the monster but it is useless. Now we are down, 
rolling over and over on the sand. I taste sand in my mouth and 
feel sand on my face. I see sea shells and flashes of sea waves go 
by as we roll furiously. It is useless. I am bound. Wrapped in 
the paper monster. I relax. Yes, I am lost. All is lost. Paper 
Doll. Paper Doll. Paper Doll. 

We arc on a bus going home now. The intervening time 
is a blank, and vague in my mind: lying on the beach, my rescue 
by Otgon and afterwards. But now I am on the warm moving 
bus, out of the spring chilled twilight, hearing the dum, dum, 

dum, dum of the bus motor and feeling the hot air of 

the bus heater on my face. In the tinted green bus window, I see 
worlds of colored buildings and people swim by, drained, empty 
brained, beaten. I feel hollow. The back of the bus seat in front 
of me is painted with a glossy, gray enamel, and I look at my 
face in it, distorted and wavy and slightly gray. But I am not 
really seeing myself; it is more as if I am looking at myself 
seeing myself, as though my realness were in total blackness 
spying through a pinhole into a scene in a lit box. 

When the bus stops, we get out, Otgon leading the way 
down the dirty rubber steps into the street. The air is chilled, 
I feel it numb me. We walk down the short block to the entrance 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



gale and stand there huddled in a shivering group while Nurse 
Sail) finds hei ke> . I happen lo look up, and directly acrosss 

the street nu eye catches a red and blue mail bo*. I look at it. 
The dull hollowness is still within me but I seem to feel - to 
acknowledge -- what I must do. Yes. Slowly and steadily with 
direction I leave the huddled group and cross the street lo the 
mail box. I hear Otgon and Nurse Sally calling after me but I pay 
no attention. When I reach the box I look at it and bring out of 
my pocket the white envelope . slightly crumpled, thai I have 
been holding all this while. Trying to decide. 1 open it and pick 
out the piece of paper that says "Contest" and read once more 
the words that set my mmd to churning. Yes. I must do it. Yes. 
I can do it. Right beneath the words, "Grand Prize" and "WIN", 
in the boldest letters I have ever seen, it says, "NAME THE DOG 
CONTEST", followed by a blank. 1 do not hesitate. I remove a 
pencil from another pocket and forcefully, yes, boldly, pressing 
hard. 1 write WALTER in the space. I open the box and, staring 
into its black void for an instant, I drop the paper in. 



bv Allan Michael Frankel 



TWO POEMS BY JEFFERSON BLUE 



My real name is not Jefferson Blue. I was born 
in Chicago, as were all my parents. In 1962 I left 
Chicago and went to college. In 1965 I flunked 
out of college and became a hockey fan, a condition 
which persisted until my marriage in 1966. From 
1966 until 1968 my wife and I lived in Seattle, 
Washington. Since 1968 we have lived in San 
Francisco, in a comfortable apartment overlooking 
an intersection and Dolores Park. We have two 
full-time dogs and another part-time dog. 
My real name is Musto Calligramme. 



ANOTHER POEM FOR THE OLD LADY 

She's 

playing with the dogs. . . . 



Beneath her hands 

they open up 

fill and transftvm space: 



A FRANK ZAPPA HISTORY OF THE WORLD 

Old Men i 

in Rock & Rol l clothes 

Old Men 

in Be- Bop clothes. 

Old Men 

in Swing clothes. 

Old Men 

in la// clothes. 

Old Men 

in Ragtime clothes 

Old Men. 



a chain of meadows 

stretched across the livingroom 

across the bedroom 

down the hall and up 

the long stairway 

of my life. 



KIM A F01 IO... MARCH l l >70 



THE RETURN OF MORNING MUSIC 

MONDAY * STRANGE LANDS AND FRIENDLY PEOPLE 
Judith Cook and Doreen Hansen of the KPFA Music 
Department will produce programs on ethnic music 
of all peoples. 

TUESDAY * TUESDAY MORNING CLUB 
With Julian White 

WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY * IN THE MORNING 
With Jack Harms 

FRIDAY * ODE TO GRAVITY 

A rebroadcast of Wednesday night 's program with 
Charles Amirkhanian. 



LIVE CONCERTS 

CAMERATA PLAYERS MARCH 8, 7:30-9:00 PM 

RADIO EVENT NO. 8, "BAGS" MARCH 28, 8:30 PM 
Live from the Berkeley Art Center. Anyone wishing to 
view the show of bags by Anthony Gnazzo, Peter Veres 
and Gene Turitz is invited to attend. There will be a $1.00 
donation for the benefit of KPFA. The show will be a 
unique integration of radio and gallery. You can witness 
it at the Gallery in Live Oak Park, Berkeley, or in your 
home over KPFA or KPFB. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY 

MARCH 30, at 8:30-10:30 PM 

Amici Delia Musica Woodwind Quintet live from the 

Fireman 's Fund Theater on California Street in San 

Francisco. Works by Mozart, Haydn, Hindemith and 

Poulenc. 

RADIO EVENT NO. 7, "JUNK AND ALL THAT JAZZ" 
BY ANTHONY GNAZZO MARCH 23 at 9 :00 PM 
Participate in your home. Listen in for instructions and 
see further warning inside the front cover of the FOLIO. 

RECORDED CONCERTS AND INTERVIEWS 

1969 CABRILLO FESTIVAL 

From Aptos, California, we present the recordings made 

by KPFA at last Summer's Cabrillo Festival. The Festival 

featured Carlos Chavez as guest: we will hear the premiere 

of his Discovery, a work for orchestra. 

MARCH 2, 9:00 PM; the 9th, 9:00 PM; the 14th, 7:00 PM 

the 15th, 7:15 PM; the 20th, 9:30 PM; the 21st, 7:30 PM. 






HGHUGHTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 
HIGHLIGHTS 

HIGHLIGHTS *^ STHGILHGIH 
HIGHLIGHTS STHGILHGIH 



STHGILHGIH 
STHGILHGIH 
STHGILHGIH 
STHGILHGIH 



BENNETT TARSHISH PRESENTS 

WEDNESDAYS AT 9:00 PM 

Formerly New Recordings from Europe on Friday evenings, 

Bennett Tarshish moves to a new time with a new program 

title. An engaging hour and a half of solid classical music. 

ODE TO GRAVITY WITH CHARLES AMIRKHANIAN 
WEDNESDAYS AT 7:00 PM: REBROADCAST ON 
FRIDAY MORNINGS AT 7:30 AM 
A new weekly program by composer and intermedia 
artist Amirkhanian which will most often deal with 
music and its extensions. 

CAL ARTS - DISNEY'S DOUGH TAKES FLIGHT 
March 7 at 7:30 PM; March 10 at 9:00 PM; 
March 13 at 7:00 PM; March 27 at 7:00 PM 
In September, California Institute of the Art's will open 
its doors to embark on a radical plan of art education. 
KPFA 's Charles Amirkhanian and Richard Friedman 
visited and talked with many members of the extraordinary 
faculty which includes Robert Corrigan, Herbert Blau, 
Allan Kaprow, Dick Higgins, Morton Subotnick, Ravi 
Shankar, and Bella Lewitsky. Financing for this intermedia 
educational system derives mainly from the estate of the 
late Walt Disney. 



PUBLIC AFFAIRS 

THE NEW WOMAN MARCH 17, 10:15 PM 
again on the 31st at 1 1 : 1 5 AM 

BIAFRAN RELIEF MARCH 1, 8:30 PM 

THE PERSON OF TOMORROW MARCH 19, 9: 15 PM 

ABOLISH THE PEACE CORPS MARCH 14, 8:30 PM 

HOW MANY PEOPLE CAN WE AFFORD?: 

HOW MANY I S TOO MANY? MARCH 1 4, 1 : 00 PM 

MAKI NG BETTER USE OF YOUR TIME 
MARCH 7 9:00 PM 

RACISM AND THE URBAN CRISIS MARCH 6, 10:00 PM 

THE GOVERNMENT AND THE CONSERVATION 
MOVEMENT MARCH 5, 10:15PM 

NEWPAL MARCH 3, 11:00 PM 

DRAMA & LITERATURE 

CINEMA HIGHLIGHTS 
THE GERMAN FILM with Hal Reynolds and 
Lottie Eisner MARCH 14, 5:00 PM and 
MARCH 31, 1:30 PM 

CINEMATOGRAPHY AND THE NEW SCULPTURE 
MARCH 5, 9:15 PM 

FOUR FILM-MAKERS - THE GRAND CENTRAL 
STATION MARCH 24, 11:00 PM 

FEINSTEIN AND FIANNI BISIACH MARCH 16, 9:00 PM 

BENTLEY & BRECHT ST, JOAN OF THE STOCKYARDS 

MARCH 12,9:15 PM 

ALAN FRANKEL READING HIS STORY 

47 ROSEMUND WAY MARCH 15, 9 : 30 PM 

BABARAMDASS MARCH 7, 1:00 PM 

KEITH BARNES READING HIS POEMS 
MARCH 18, 11:15 AM, and the 31st, 7:30 PM 

ON STAGE EVERY FRIDAY AT 8:00 PM 

IVANOV 

MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING 

THE GLASS MEN A GERIE 

ANTIGONE 



JKPFA FOLIO.. .MARCH 1970 



COMMENTATORS AND OTHER PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM PRODUCERS 



STEW ALBERT, Yippie activist 

HENRY ANDERSON, free lance social analyst and writer 

DAVID N- BORTIN, Bay Area attorney who generally discusses "law and order" 

FATHER EUGENE BOYLE, chairman of Commission on Social Justice, Archdiocese 
of San Francisco 

GEORGE BRUNN, judge of the Berkeley— Albany Mmicipal Court 

HAL DRAPER of the Independent Socialist Clubs and an editor of New Politics 
and/or Anne Draper of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers staff & secretary of Citizens 
for Farm Labor 

GERALD FEIGEN, newspaper & magazine writer & physician 

PETER FRANCK,East Bay attorney active with the National Lawyers Guild and the 
Movement Liberation Front 

TOM HAYDEN, political activist and one of the founders of SDS 
JEANETTE HERMES, attorney who has done research in Chinese law 

JOHN HOPKINS, educational assistant for the Consumer's Cooperative of Berkeley 

MARVE HYMAN, chemical engineer and lecturer on pollution control and computer 
applications 

J. DENNIS LAWRENCE, computer programmer at Livermore 

RICHARD LOCK, former resident and teacher in Japan, now doing graduate work 
at UC Berkeley 

ROBERT S. MAC COLLISTER, high fidelity consultant 

WILLIAM MANDEL, widely recognized authority on the USSR and author of 
Russia Re Examined 

DICK MEISTER, labor writer 

JACK MORRISON, former member of San Francisco Board of Supervisors 

STEVE MURDOCK, writer and commentator on political affairs 

KEITH MURRAY of Ecology Action 

NICHOLAS PETRIS, Democratic State Senator from the 1 1th District 

ROBERT PICKUS, president of the WiWld Without War Council of the U.S. 

HENRY RAMSEY, Richmond attorney 

HAROLD REYNOLDS, graduate student in German at UC Berkeley 

SIDNEY ROGER, journalist specializing in labor affairs 

BEN SEAVER, Peace Education Secretary of the American Friends Service Committee 
of Northern California 

PETER SHAPIRO, member of the Joe Hill caucus of SDS at San Francisco State College 

LEWIS F. SHERMAN, attorney, and Republican Slate Senator from the 8th District 

ROBERT TIDEMAN, director of the Henry George School of Social Science in San Francisco 



KIM A 1 01,10... MARCH l l )7() 




<*G*4 1 |fc*cN> 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Beethoven: Sonata No. 21 

inC 

Barenboim, piano 

*AngelS-36581 (29) 
Weinberg: Quartet No. 2 

for Strings (1960-4) 

Composers Quartet 
♦Columbia MS 7284 (25) 
Bach: Cantata No. 170 

Lehmann, Bavarian State 

Orch. 

Archive ARC 3067 (23) 
Beethoven: Sonata No. 20 

in G 

Backhaus, piano 

♦London CS 6584 (6) 
Foss: Time Cycle 

Bernstein, Columbia 

Sym. Orch. 

♦Columbia MS 6280(31) 
Brahms: Serenade No. 2, 

Op. 16 

Abbado, Berlin Phil. 

*DGG 139 371 (34) 



11:00 

*JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

NIXON'S VIETNAMIZATION 
POLICY AND POLITICS 
OF THE WAR 

A startling and informative 
speech by Professor F r anz 
Schurmann of U.C. Berkeley's 
Departments of History and 
Sociology. Sponsored by the 
Graduate Theological Union, 
the speech was given on Martin 
Luther King's birthday, Jan- 
uary 15, 1970. 

2:15 

A WORKING MAN'S 
POETRY 

Earl Trusty, a New York 
window washer and Socialist, 
reads his own poetry. The 
poems deal with Mr. Trusty's 
disenchantment with the Cap- 
italist system and each poem 
has an appropriate musical 
background. From WBAI. 
Re-broadcast. 



MONDAY 2 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

STRANGE LANDS AND 
FRIENDLY PEOPLE 
MUSIC FROM RWANDA 
This is the first program in a 
new series to be heard weekly 
at this time. This program 
deals with the 3 tribal groups 
of the Central African country 
of Rwanda. Produced by Jud- 
ith Cook. 
Barenreiter BM 30 L 2302. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentary. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Tchaikovsky: Symphony 

No. 5. Svetlanov, USSR 

Symphony Orchestra 

*Angel SR 40055 (48) 
Brahms: String Quintet No. 1 

in F. Amadeus Quartet; 

Aronwitz, viola 

*DGG 139 430 (25) 
Mozart: Sonata No. 4, K.282 

Kraus, piano 

EpicBC 1385 (13) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF 
INFERIORITY 
Norma Haan, a research psy- 
chologist and- professor in the 
graduate school of social wel- 
fare at the University of Calif, 
in Berkeley, speaking at a 
teach-in on the oppression of 
women held at San Francisco 
State College on Dec. 10, 1969. 

11:30 

SYMPOSIUM ON TRADI- 
TIONAL AFRICAN ART 
Held at the Hampton Institute. 
On this program will be heard 
the first three sessions of the 
symposium. From session one, 
Dr. Richard A. Long, the dir- 
ector of the college's museum, 
offers welcoming remarks, and 
Dr. William Fagg, of the Bri- 
tish Museum, talks about "Af- 
rican Art as a Synthetic Study!' 
From session two, Daniel P. 
Biebuyck, of the University of 
Delaware, speaks on "Art as a 
Didactic Device in African 
Initiation Systems" and Mar- 
garet Plass, of the University 



2:30 

/ PURITANI 
Vincenzo Bellini 
An opera in three acts to a li- 
bretto by C. Pepoli. We hear 
the Symphonic Orchestra and 
Chorus of RAI of Rome, the 
conductor Fernando Previtali, 
and the Chorus Master Gaetano 
Ricittelli. 

Elvira....Lina Pagliughi 
Lord Arturo Talbot. ...Mario 

Filippeschi 
Riccardo... .Rolando Panerai 
Giorgio Walton. ...Sesto 

Bruscantini 
Bruno.. ..Enzo Quinto 
Enrichetta.... Lucia Quinto 
Presented by Melvin Jahn. 

5:30 

VIEWS AND REVIEWS 

Eleanor Sully 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

COMMENTARY 
Steve Murdock 



of Pa., talks on "Connoisseur- 
ship in African Art". From 
session three, Dr. S. I. Haya- 
kawa, of San Francisco State, 
talks about "The American 
Significance of African Art." 

1:30 

ERISMENA 
(opera excerpts) 
By Pier Francesco Cavalli 
From a concert given Sept. 16, 
1969, during the September 
Nights Festival at Liege, Bel- 
gium. In this English version 
the soloists are heard with the 
Chamber Orchestra of the Bel- 
gium Radio and Television, 
conducted by Brian Priestman. 

2:00 

EIGHT AGAINST THE 
DRAFT 

Bill Schechner's exclusive in- 
terviews with the New York 
draft destroyers. (WBAI) 

2:30 

THE AUTOMOBILE AND 
AIR POLUTION 
A panel discussion recorded at 
a meeting sponsored by the 
American Chemical Society's 
California Section at UC, Ber- 
keley, Jan. 26, 1970. Partici- 
pants were Professor of Chem- 
istry James N. Pitts, UC, Riv- 
erside, speaking on "Current 
Mechanisms for Photochemical 



7:15 

THE COUNTRY OF THE 

BLIND 

By H. G. Wells 

Bobbie Harms reads R G. 

Wells' story, The Country of 

the Blind. 

8:30 

BIAFRAN RELIEF 

Lincoln Bergman interviews 

Dr. Frank Catchpool, the only 

American doctor who's been 

behind the lines in Biafra. 

9:15 

CONVERSATION WITH 
MARCEL MARCEAU 
Morgan Upton, of the San 
Francisco. Committee, talks 
with Marcel Marceau about 
the art of mime and its place 
in the current world of social 
protest. KPFA Archives, 1968 

10:00 

♦STAYS FRESH LONGER 
A program of popular music 
much of which was recorded 
at the Fillmore West and the 
Matrix, and some originating 
live in our studios. Produced 
by Marc, Warren, Lauren and 
Leon. 



Smog;" Professor of Engineer- 
ing Ernest S. Starkman, UC, 
Berkeley, "Engineering Prob- 
lems and Feasibility of Alter- 
nate Means of Propulsion;" 
and Senator Nicholas C. Petris, 
State Sanator, Oakland, speak- 
ing on "Political Problems on 
Smog Control." The moderator 
was John Harkins of Scott 
Research Laboratories, San 
Bernadino. 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Wolf: Quartet for Strings 

LaSalle Quartet 

♦DGG 139 376(42) 
Bach : Choral Partita; Canzona 

in d. Richter, organ 

♦DGG 139 387 (22) 
Lasry: Chronophagie 1 

sound sculptures 

♦Columbia MS 7314(21) 
Mozart: Concerto No. 11 for 

Piano and Orchestra 

Anda, piano; Camerata 

Academica des Salzburger 

Mozarteums 

5:30 

CONFRONTATION 

WASHINGTON 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Lewis F. Sherman 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



MONDAY 

^ 7:00 

< SOVIET PRESS AND 

Q PERIODICALS 

~y William Mandel 

O 7:15 

^ FEDER1CO 

The Mind's Eye Theater pre- 
sents a radio entertainment 
based on the life of the Spanish 
poet Federico Garcia Lorca, 
written, produced and directed 
by David Davidson Reiff. A 
stylized biographical montage, 
containing material presented 
in English for the first time. 
(WBAI) 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

CABRILLO FESTIVAL 

Mozart: Overture to the 

Abduction from the Seraglio 
Harrison: Suite No. 1 for 

Strings. Williams, Amici 

Delia Musica Orchestra 
Mozart: Quartet in F for Oboe 

and Strings, K. 370 

Amici Chamber Ensemble 
Schumann: Concerto in a 

Williams, Amici Delia 

Musica Orchestra 
Presented in stereo by Warren 
Van Orden. 



10:30 

*WORDS 

A program of new poetry and 

word art produced by Clark 

Coolidge. 

11:30 

EXPERIMENTS IN ART 
AND TECHNOLOGY 
With Richard Friedman 



12:00 

♦INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

With Richard Friedman 



20l6Ashby 
(above Adeline] 
Berkeley 
845-4898 



tuwwv 



3 |f*®* 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

TUESDAY MORNING CLUB 

With Julian White. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Lewis Sherman. 

8:45 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

program with William Mandel. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Pergolesi: Concertino No. 2 

in G. de Stoutz, Zurich 

Chamber Orchestra 

Bach Guild 638 (13) 
Ravel: Bolero 

Munch, Orchestre de Paris 

* Angel S 36584 (17) 
Borodin: Quartet No. 2 for 

Strings. Drolc Quartet 

*DGG 139 425(29) 
Tchaikovsky: Quartet No. 1 

for Strings. Drolc Quartet 

*DOO 139 425 (32) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

THE TURBULENT SIXTIES 
The first of four documentaries 
produced by WBAI's public 
affairs dept. from ten years of 
archives. 

1. Militarism and Democracy 
Produced by Dale Minor. 
(WBAI) 



12:15 

SHOPTALK 

Bob Kuttner and Bill Schech- 
ner of WBAI talk with Jeff, 
Shero, Editor of the under- 
ground paper, The Rat, about 
the paper's harassment since 
one of its staff was arrested in 
connection with the New York 
bombings. (WBAI) 

12:30 

THEATRE NEW YORK 
A discussion of three off-off 
Broadway productions of 
Macbeth by the directors of 
two of those productions. Bill 
Accles of the Roundabout 
Theatre and Herb Barnett of 
the Theatre Projects Company 
tell Ann Rivers about some of 
the problems involved in pro- 
ducing Shakespeare off-off- 
Broadway. (WBAI) 

1:00 

BUDAPEST FESTIVAL 
A concert featuring the Hun- 
garian State Symphony Orch- 
chestra conducted by Vilmos 
Komor. 

Schumann .Symphony No. 2 
Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto 
No.2. Soloist, Daniel Shafran 
Stravinsky: Firebird Suite 
Presented by Warren Van Orden 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 
Open Hour. 

3:30 

CONCERT OF 
NEW RELEASES 

5:30 

CONSUMER PROTECTION 

John Hopkins 




POOH'S CORNER ] 
Toys 



5:45 

DRAMA AND LITERATUR 

REVIEW 

Eleanor Sully 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Peter Shapiro 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

7:30 

FILM REVIEW 

Margo Skinner 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

MARTIN KOEN1G PRESENTS 
BALKAN FOLK MUSIC 
Music collected and recorded 
in the field over a four-year 
period by Koenig who issues 
his own records on the Balkan 
Arts label. Tonight we hear an 
introductory program which 
will acquaint our audience 
with the sounds of the Balkans. 

10:00 

MORTON MARCUS: POET 
Morton Marcus talks with Elea- 
nor Sully about his work and 
reads poems from his book 
which will be published shortly. 




11:00 
NEWPAL 

Ronald Pereira, ex-heroin ad- 
dict aged 21, tells KPFA's 
Elsa Knight Thompson about 
an organization which began 
inside Santa Rita Prison and 
describes its problems and 
objectives. 

11:30 

THE POETRY OF 

KAREN SWENSON 

Miss Swenson, whose poems 

have appeared widely in little 

(and sometimes not-so-little) 

magazines, reads her works. 

(WBAI) 

12:00 

♦INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

Avant-garde jazz with DeLeon 

Harrison. 



10 



KIM A FOLK).. .MARCH I 1 ) 70 



+ -A>_>- .>_> 




4 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Peter Shapiro. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Ragas of South India 

M. Nageswara Rao, vina 

♦Nonesuch H 72032 (31) 
Subotnick: Touch 

electronic music 

*ColumbiaMS 7316(31) 
Chopin: Etudes, Op. 10 

Vasary, piano 

*DGG 136 454 (30) 
Teleman: Trio in e 

Larrieu Ensemble 

♦Nonesuch H 71061 (12) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

THE COPERNICUS 
ANNIVERSARY 
An interview with Professor 
W. Zonn, director of the As- 
tronomical Observatory of the 
Polish Astronomical Society. 
He is traveling in the U.S. 
making arrangements for the 
1973 celebrations of the 500th 
anniversary of the birth of 

THURSDAY 

7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Robert Pickus. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Saint-Saens: Septet for Piano, 

Trumpet and Strings, Op. 65 

Guilet Quartet Ensemble 

HelidorH 25012(16) 
Schubert: Symphony No. 1 

in D, D. 82. Ristenpart, 

Stuttgart Symphony Orch. 

♦Nonesuch H 71230 (32) 
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 4 

Ormandy, Philadelphia Orch. 

♦Columbia MS 6459 (61) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 



Copernicus. The interviewer 
is Prof. Elizabeth Scott, chair- 
man of the Dept. of Statistics, 
U.C., Berkeley. 

11:30 

EDUCATION FOR THE 
WEAKER SEX 
Marjorie Uren, a graduate stu- 
dent in English at the Univer- 
sity of California, Berkeley, 
and part time instructor of 
English at Stanford, speaking 
at a teach-in on the oppression 
of women held at San Fran- 
cisco State College on Dec. 10, 
1969. 

12:00 

UC NOON CONCERT 

New music from the graduate 

composition seminar. 

Broadcast live. 

1:00 

FEINSTEIN AND GIANNI 
BISIACH IN LOCARNO: 
THE TWO KENNEDYS 
Signor Gianni Bisiach, journa- 
list and documentary film- 
maker from Rome, presented 
The Two Kennedys, a long 
documentary, at the Locarno. 
Film Festival, Oct. 1969. Pro- 
fessor Herbert Feinstein inter- 
views Bisiach immediately af- 
ter the showing. Although the 
footage of the film comes 
from the U.S., it has an Italian 
soundtrack - save for the voi- 
ces of Marilyn Monroe and 
Lauren Bacall for whom the 
film-maker could find no Ital- 
ian counter parts. 
(Repeated 3/16, at 9 PM.) 



1:45 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 

Cesa Guerra Peixe: 

Quarteto No. 2. 
Quartet from the Radio de- 
partment of the ministry of 
Education and Culture. 

Five Trouas Capichabas and 
O Vaquero. Priscilla Rocha 
Pereira, soprano; Maria Sylvia 
Pinto, piano. 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Brahms: Symphony No.: 1 

Bernstein, N.Y. Philharmonic 

Columbia ML 5602 (44) 
Glazounov: Concerto for 

Saxophone and Strings 

Abato, saxophone 

♦Nonesuch H 71030(13) 
Sibelius: Rakastava, Op. 14; 

Canzonetta, Op. 62a; 

Romance in C, Op. 42. 

Winograd, conductor 

HeliodorH 25023 (23) 
Songs of Aboriginal Australia 

and Torres Strait 

Folkways FE 4102 

(until 5:30) 

5:30 

MILITARY MONITOR 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Robert Pickus 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



wssw^^sr^F^srsstw^iSriisrs^ESE^^ j ^S^^!mrr'msrm ! fS!WWW^^r^^^ 



11:15 

OPENING DOORS TO 
OURSELVES 

Mark Probert is a tele-gnostic, 
a man through whom other 
consciousnesses communicate 
His teachers, called the Inner 
Circle of Light, range from a 
19th century cleric to a 500, 
000 year old high priest from 
a Himilayan civilization. For 
26 years they have used Mr. 
Probert to pass on their ideas 
as to the roads man should 
follow in finding self-realiza- 
tion and honest happiness. 
These two hours and 45 min. 
are drawn from a Wallace 
Berry Show broadcast in March 
1968. 

2:00 

WHATEVER BECAME OF... 
PHILLIPPE DE LACEY? 
The child actor from the silent 
films talks with Richard Lam- 
parski about his roles in "Peter 
Pan" and his impressions of 
Greta Garbo in an interview 



recorded in his Beverly Hills 
office. 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

5:30 

JAPANESE PRESS REVIEW 

Richard Lock 

5:45 

MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Tom Hayden 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

MUSIC IN AMERICA 

With Chris Strachwitz 



7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

With Charles Amirkhanian 

AMERICAN MUSIC ON 78 's 

Bernstein: Sonata for Clarinet 

and Piano. Oppenheim, 

clarinet; Bernstein, piano 

Hargail MW 501 
Salzedo: Concerto for Harp 

and 7 Winds {1926) 

Lawrence, harp; Salzedo, 

conductor 

Columbia MMA 8 
Piston: Quartet for Strings 

(1933) Dorian Quartet 

Columbia M 388 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 

PRESENTS 

Music of Arnold Bax HI 

Tale the Pine Trees Knew 

Piano Sonata No. 3 

Symphony No. 3 

10:30 

SURPLUS PROPHETS 
A live broadcast presenting 
guests who are active in chang- 
ing the world of politics, the 
media, economics, the arts and 
sciences. Telephone call-ins 
welcome. Hosts and animation 
Tom Hurwitz, Charles Ras- 
mussen, and Reese Erlich. 

12:00 
♦SOURCE 

Produced by Larry Austin, 
Arthur Woodbury and Stan 
Lunetta, editors of the avant- 
garde music periodical, Source 
magazine. 



THURSDAY 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:15 

CINEMATOGRAPHY AND 
THE NEW SCULPTURE 
Mike Heizer, Robert Morris, 
Dennis Oppenheim, Richard 
Serra discuss with Wiloughby 
Produced by J. Siegel. (WBAI) 

10:15 

THE GOVERNMENT AND 

THE CONSERVATION 

MOVEMENT 

Barry Weisberg talks with Elsa 

Knight Thompson about the 

role of government in the new 

popular field of conservation, 

a role he feels leaves much to 

be desired. Mr. Weisberg is on 

the staff of the Bay Area 

Institute. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



11 




6 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast 

news. 



of last night's 



7:30 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

Rebroadcast of the Wednesday 

night show with Charles Amir- 

khanian. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Tom Hayden. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Nielsen: Symphony No. 5, 

Op. 50. Bernstein, New York 

Philharmonic 

*ColumbiaMS 6114 (34) 
Schoenberg: Three Pieces, 

Op. 11. Jacobs, piano 

Ducretet-Thompson 320 C 

125 (15) 
Stravinsky: Violin Concerto 

in D. Gitlis, violin; Byrns, 

Colorne Orchestra 

Dover HCR 5208 (22) 
Hiller-Baker: Computer 

Cantata (1963) 

Hamm, soprano; McKenzie, 

University of Illinois 

Chamber Players 

Heliodor HS 25053 (23) 



Hiller-Isaacson: lUiac Suite for 

String Quartet (1957) 

Uni. of Illinois Composition 

String Quartet 

♦Heliodor HS 25053 (18) 
The final two works on this 
concert were organized by 
means of an electronic digital 
computer. 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

WOMEN IN THE 
UNIVERSITIES 
Marijean Suelzle, a graduate 
student in sociology at UC, 
Berkeley, and the vice presi- 
dent of the Women's Sociology 
Caucus there, speaking at a 
teach-in on the oppression of 
women at San Francisco State 
College, Dec. 10, 1969. 

11:30 

PANORAMA OF SWEDISH 

MUSIC 

Franz Berwald and Opera. 

(Radio Sweden) 

12:00 

THE VALUE OF PSYCHOTIC 
EXPERIENCE: SANITY, 
MADNESS, BLOWOUT 
CENTER, PART I 



SATIIRBAY 



Continuing the Esalen Institute 
series, Ronald D. Laing talks 
about establishing a supportive 
environment where people can 
turn a psychotic experience 
into a voyage of discovery. 
The program will be broadcast 
in four parts. 

1:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

2:15 

DANCE REVIEW 

With Betty Roszak. 

2:30 

THE DYNAMICS OF THE 
BLACK MANIFESTO 
James Forman explains what 
he is demanding and why. 
From an October speech at 
the University of Pennsylvania 
(WBAI) 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Liszt: Annees de Pelerinage: 
Premiere Annee Suisse 
Fiorentino, piano 
Dover HCR 5257 (52) 

Constant: 24 Preludes for 
Orchestra. Bruck, ORTF 
Philharmonic Orchestra 
*Heliodor HS 25058 (16) 

W.F.Bach: Duet in e; Duet in F 
Rampal and Baron, flutes 
Dover HCR 5264 (21) 

Lully : Plaude, Laetare Gallia 
Nonesuch H 1039(13) 



5:30 

REVIEW OF THE 

BRITISH WEEKLIES 

5:45 

REPORT TO THE 

LISTENER 

Al Silbowitz 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Stew Albert 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

THE RECORDED ART OF 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
Prokofiev: Violin Concerto 

No. 2. Jasha Heifitz, violin 
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 9 

8:00 

IVANOV 

BY ANTON CHEKHOV 

The original Broadway cast 

recording, directed by John 

Gielgud, starring Gielgud and 

Vivien Leigh. 

10:00 

RACISM AND THE URBAN 
CRISIS 

A lecture by Mrs. Shirley 
Chisholm of New York, the 
nation's first black Congress- 
woman, given January 11, 
1970 at U.C. Berkeley. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast 

news 



of last night's 



8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Stew Albert. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF THE 
BRITISH WEEKLIES 
Rebroadcast from last night. 

9:00 

PLANET BALLUNAR 
Poetry from the Butterfly Box 
with Anne Hedley & Friends. 

11:00 

CHILDRENS BOOK 
SAMPLER 
Ellyn Beaty 

11:15 

MORNING CONCERT 

Lou Harrison: Suite for Piano 

Hemmingway, piano 

KPFA tape (18) 
Roy Harris: Symphony No. 2 

(for Symphonic Band) 

Harris, U.S. Military 

Academy Band 

Pittsburgh Festival disc 

CB 175 (13) 



12 



Ralph Vaughan Williams: 
Serenade to Music (1938) 
Wood, BBC Symphony and 
16 soloists— original cast of 
world premiere, recorded 
October 15, 1938 
Columbia SED 5553- 
78 rpm(14) 

12:00 

AUDIO EQUIPMENT 

REPORT 

With R. S. MacCollister, 

high fidelity consultant. 

12:30 

BOOKS 

With Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

BABA RAM DASS 
Baba Ram Dass, Richard Al- 
pert, well-known to our listen- 
ers through an earlier tape, 
Transformation Of A Man, 
talks about the basic techni- 
ques of meditation and "bring- 
ing your life into the spirit." 
Taped in New York City, 
March, 1969, and made avail- 
able to KPFA by Paul Farmer. 

3:30 

THIN AIR 

Recent developments in the 

arts and conversations with 

visiting artists. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES WITH 
ANTHONY BOUCHER 
Alexander Kipnis III 



5:00 

MUSIC OF THE ITALIAN 

MASTERS 

Alessandro Scarlatti : Sonata 
for Recorder, Flute and 
Strings. Boettcher, 
Wiener Solisten 

Caldara: // Giuoco Del 
Quadriglio (The Game of 
Quadrille), cantata for 4 
sopranos. Loehrer, Societa 
Cameristica di Lugano 

Brunetti: Symphony No. 23 
in F. Jenkins, Angelicum 
Orchestra of Milan 

6:00 

FRENCH NEWS ANALYSIS 

Prepared and read in French 

by Pierre Idiart, editor of the 

weekly newspaper, Le 

Californien. 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

WOMANKIND 

Commentary and discussion 

from the feminist community. 

(WBAI) 

7:30 

CAL ARTS - DISNEY'S 
DOUGH TAKES FLIGHT 
An introduction to the con- 
cepts behind the founders of 
this new school of the arts 
which opens in Sept., 1970. 
Produced by Charles Amirk- 
hanian and Richard Friedman. 



8:30 

SHOSTAKOVITCH: 
SYMPHONY NO. 14 
Radio Moscow presents ex- 
cerpts from this recently pre- 
miered work which contains 
eleven movements in all. Mos- 
cow Chamber Orchestra con- 
ducted by Rudolf Barshai, 
with Galina Vishnevskaya, 
soprano. 

9:00 

MAKING BETTER USE OF 
YOUR TIME 

Alan Lakein, time manage- 
ment consultant, is interview- 
by Elsa Knight Thompson. 

9:45 

THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS 
OF DAY CARE 
A talk by educator-author 
Paul Goodman, recorded on 
the U.C. Berkeley campus, 
Jan. 20, 1970. Audible por- 
tions of the question and ans- 
wer session that followed are 
included. He spoke under the 
auspices of AFSCME, Local 
1695, the Berkeley campus 
union for non-academic em- 
ployees. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



KPFA FOLIO...MARCH 1970 



In 1908, thousands of working 
women from the lower east side of 
New York held a demonstration 
to support their demands for the 
right to vote, for better working 
conditions and shorter hours, and 
for legislation against child labor. 
In 1910 at the suggestion of Clara 
Zetkin, a colleague of Lenin's, the 
day was declared International 
Women's Day in honor of the wo- 
men workers in New York. Today's 
programming will be devoted to 
women and international women's 
day, including the presentation of 
music composed by women, cover- 
age of the Bay Area celebration of 
the day and other special programs. 

8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Clara Schumann: Trio in G, 

Op. 17(1846) 

Mannes-Gimpel-Silva Trio 

DeccaDL9555(25) 
Vivian Fine: Alcestis (1960) 

for Martha Graham 

Strickland, Imperial Phil. 

of Tokyo 

CRI 145(11) 
Louise Talma: La Corona — 

Holy Sonnets of John Donne 

(1954-5) 

Aks, Dorian Chorale 

CRI 187 (20) 
Lili Boulanger: Vieille Priere 

Bouddhique, "Daily Prayer 

for the Whole Universe" 

(1914-17) 

Senechal, tenor; Markevitch, 

conductor 

Everest LPBR 6059 (7) 
Peggy Glanville-Hicks: 3 

Gymnopedies 

Perlea, RIAS Sym. Orch. 

Remington R-199-188 (8) 
Peggy Glanville-Hicks: Sonata 

for Piano and Percussion 

(1952) 

Bussoti, piano; Surinach, 

N.Y. Percussion Group 

Columbia ML 4990 (10) 
Joanna M. Beyer: Endless 

Cage, percussion ensemble 

KPFA tape (5) 
Vivian Fine: Sinfonia and 

Fugato 

Helps, piano 

Victor LM 7042 (6) 
Ruth Crawford Seeger: Study 

in Mixed Accents (1929); 

9 Preludes (1924-8) 

Bloch, piano 

*CRISD247 (16) 
Priaulx Painier: Quartet No. 1 

for Strings 

Amadeus Quartet 

London 78's (15) 
Pauline Oliveros: / of IV 

(1966) 

electronic music 

♦Odyssey 3216 0160 (20) 

11:00 

JAZZ, BLUES, WOMEN AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 



SUNDAY MARCH 8 INIERNAHONALWaVlENSDAY 



Vol. XVia— No. nil] 



NEW VORK. SATURDAY, JINK 1.1, 1R74. 



sSaitf^ !i-ip€l^ 




THOMAS NAST: 'JEWELS AMONG SWINE' 






1:00 

PROGRAMMING 
PERTAINING TO THE 
DAY 

3:00 

ROCCA, LODOVICO 
// Dibuk 

An opera in prologue and 
three acts to a libretto based 
on a dramatic legend by Shalom 
An-Ski. Performed by the 
Orchestra and Chorus of RAI 
of Milan, conducted by Alfredo 
Simonetto, and with Chorus 
Master Roberto Benaglio. 
Reb. Sender.. .Gino Orlandini 
Leah, his daughter.. .Elisabetta 

Barbato 
Frade, Leah's Nurse. ..Cloe 

Elmo 
Hanan, a Talmud Student 

...Carlo Franzini 
Reb Ezriel, Miracle Rabbi 

...Franco Calogero Cala- 

brese 
Michael.. .Filippo Maero 
The Messenger... Aldo 

Bertocci 
Gitel...Rasalia Lauria 
Basia...Amalia Bertola 
Nachmann...Perluigi Latinucci 
First Batlon...Eralso Coda 



Blind Woman. ..Ortensia 

Beggiato 
The Vioce of Nissen... 

Sergio Liliani 
Presented by Bill Collins. 

5:30 

VIEWS AND REVIEWS 

Eleanor Sully 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

APPROPRIATE 

PROGRAMMING 

7:30 

LIVE CONCERT BY THE 
CAMERATO PLAYERS 
Laurette Goldberg, keyboard 
artist with the Oakland Sym- 
phony, is largely responsible 
for organizing a new Bay Area 
ensemble devoted to the per- 
formance of Baroque music. 
Tonight we present the pre- 
miere concert of the Camerata 
Players. We hear music of 
Pachelbel, Boismortier^resco- 
baldi, Hotteterre, Vivaldi, 
Quantz, and the Dutch con- 
temporary Hans Martin Linde. 



The performers are Laurette 
Goldberg, harpsicord; Ron 
Erickson, violin; Bruce Haines, 
baroque oboe and recorder, 
and Sally Kell, gamba and 
cello. Assisting tonight will 
be Larry Duckies, flute, and 
Peter Ballinger, recorder. 

9:00 

SOMETHING ABOUT 

WOMEN 

Eleanor Sully 

10:00 

STAYS FRESH LONGER 
We conclude our day of 
programming for International 
Women's Day with two pro- 
grams from our archives which 
have been very popular. First 
at ten, we rebroadcast the 
popular archive documentary 
on the life and music of Billie 
Holliday produced by Gene 
DeAiessi. Then at about mid- 
night, we will hear another 
rebroadcast, of the concert by 
Nina Simone recorded in Berk- 
eley last October. 



KPFA FOLIO...MARCH 1970 



SUNDAY MARCH 8 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY 



13 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast 

news. 



of last night's 



7:30 

STRANGE LANDS AND 
FRIENDLY PEOPLE 
(THE MUSIC OF THE 
SENUFO) 

Second in a series, this pro- 
gram on the music of the 
Senufo of West Africa covers 
the seven groups of the north- 
ern territory of the Ivory 
Coast. Barenreiter BM 30 L 
2308. Produced by Judith 
Cook. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Telemann: The Times of 

Day. Koch, Berlin Chamber 

Orchestra 

Heliodor HS 25041 (59) 
Haydn: Symphony No. 101 in 

D, "Clock". Beecham, 

Royal Philharmonic 

Angel 36255 (28) 
Stockhausen: Zyklus 

Caskel, percussion 

TIME 58001 (12) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 



MONDAY 



11:30 

STRATEGIC ARMS 
LIMITATION 

Wolfgang Panofsky, professor 
of physics and director of the 
accelerator laboratory at Stan- 
ford University, and former 
member of the President's 
Science Advisory Commission, 
explores the complex world of 
military technology — ABM, 
MIRV, SS-9, SA-2, Minute- 
man, Safeguard, etc. One of 
the University of Chicago ser- 
ies, From the Midway. 

12:30 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 

Francisco Mignone: 
Maracatu de Chico-Rei, an 
opera. Mignone, Orquesta 
Sinfonica Nacional da Radio 
Ministerio da Educacao e 
Cultura 



1:00 

EXISTENTIAL VACUUM: 
A CHALLENGE TO 
PSYCHIATRY 

Dr. Viktor Frankl, founder of 
logotherapy, delivers a lecture 
sponsored by the Esalen Insti- 
tute at the First Unitarian 
Church in San Francisco on 
October 13, 1969. 
(Rebroadcast) 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Bach: The Art of Fugue. 

Ristenpart, Chamber 

Orchestra of Saar 

Nonesuch HB 73013 (95) 

5:30 

JUDICIAL REVIEW 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Nicholas Petris 



11:15 

THE ECONOMICS OF 
OPPRESSION 

Joan Jordan, a former factory 
worker who was replaced by 
automation and is now a stu- 
dent at San Francisco State 
College, speaking at a teach-in 
on the oppression of women 
held at San Francisco State on 
December 10, 1969. 




HARPSICHORD 

and Early Pianoforte 
restoration, repairs 

1095 VALLEY FORGE DRIVE 
SUNNYVALE, CALIF. 94087 

Phone: 4 1 5-968-4 1 32 Agent for new and used harpsichords 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast 



of last night's 




7:30 

TUESDAY MORNING CLUB 

With Julian White 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Nicholas Petris. 

8:45 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

William Mandel 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Telemann: Concerto a 7 in F 

for .'1 Violins 

I musici 

""Phillips PHS 900 188 (15) 



Haydn: Symphony No. 22 
Goberman, Vienna State 
Opera Orchestra 
♦Odyssey 3216 0374 (18) 

Ginastera: Estancia Ballet 
Goosens, London Symphony 
♦Everest 3013 (12) 

Bartok : Piano Concerto No. 1 
P. Serkin, piano; Ozawa, 
Chicago Symphony 
Victor LSC 2929(26) 

Hindemith: Violin Concerto 
Gitlis, violin; Reichert, 
Westphalia Symphony 
♦Turnabout TV 34276 (25) 

Ml I., 

MORNING READING 



11:15 

THE TURBULENT SIXTIES 
The second of four documen- 
taries produced by WBAI's 
public affairs dept. from ten 
years of archives. 
II. Youth 
Produced by Bill Schechner. 

12:30 

WHATEVER BECAME OF... 
JACK HALEY? 
The memorable comedian from 
vaudeville and movies ("Wiz- 
ard of Oz") is interviewed in 
his Beverly Hills Mansion by 
Richard Lamparski. (WBAI) 



6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

William Mandel 

7:30 

THE MOVIES 

(WBAI) 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

CABRILLO FESTIVAL 

Vivaldi: Spring from The 

Four Seasons 
Fred Fox: BEC -10 

(world premiere) 
Stravinsky: Dumbarton Oaks 

Concerto 
Schubert : Mass in G 
Williams, Amici Delia Musica 
Orchestra with the Festival 
Chorus directed by Gil Seeley. 
Recorded August 16, 1969, 
and presented by Warren Van 
Orden. 

10:30 

WORDS* 

A program of new poetry and 

word art produced by Clark 

Coolidge. 

11:30 

EXPERIMENTS IN ART 
AND TECHNOLOGY 
With Richard Friedman 

12:00 

♦INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

With Richard Friedman 



ci&4 10 I& 5 ®" 



1:00 

BUDAPEST FESTIVAL 1968 
A concert featuring the Hun- 
garian State Symphony Orch- 
estra condected by Andras 
Korodi. 
Bela Bartok: Two Pictures - 

Blossom; Dance of the Village 
Andras Mihaly: Violin Concerto 
with obligatto piano and 
orchestra, featuring Mihaly 
Szucs, violin; Endre Petri, 
piano. 
Zoltan Kodaly: Summer 

Evening 
Debussy: La Mer 
Hosted by Warren Van Orden. 



2:30 

OPEN HOUR 
Rebroadcast of 
Open Hour. 



last night's 



3:30 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 



14 



KPKA FOl 10. ..MARCH 1970 



TUESDAY 



5:30 

ECOLOGY & POLITICS 

Keith Murray 

5:45 

DRAMA AND LITERATURE 

REVIEW 

Eleanor Sully 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Father Eugene Boyle 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

7:30 

ON WRITERS AND 

WRITING 

With Marc Ratner 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 



>„_0_>_ <►_ 4; 



9:00 

CAL ARTS - DISNEY'S 
DOUGH TAKES FLIGHT 
Second in a series of programs 
on the new school of the arts 
soon to open in Southern Cal- 
ifornia. See highlight listing. 

10:00 

NIGERIA-BIAFRA: THE 
INTERNATIONAL AND 
DOMESTIC SITUATIONS 
An interview with Peter Ekeh, 
the chairman of the Nigerian 
Students Association at U.C. 
Berkeley. Lincoln Bergman, 
KPFA's News Director, con- 
ducts the interview. 

11:00 

JAMES HOUSTON 
NOVELIST 

The yourig California novelist, 
author of Gig, reads from his 
own work and tlaks with Elea- 
nor Sully about his past, his 
present and his plans. 
(Rescheduled) 



12:00 

INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

With De Leon Harrison. 




11 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Father Boyle. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
ANSERMET MEMORIAL 
ALBUM 

We hear two discs recently 
released as a set on the London 
label. The first consists of a 
recording of Ernest Ansermet 
rehearsing the New Philhar- 
monia Orchestra in Stravinsky's 
Firebird Ballet. The second 
contains a performance of the 
complete Firebird. 
*London FBD-S1 (97) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

WORKING CLASS WOMEN 
Two talks given at a teach-in 
about the oppression of wo- 
men at San Francisco State 
on Dec. 10, 1969. The first is 
by Lillian House, a member of 
the United Electrical Workers 
which was on strike against 



her employer, the General El- 
ectric Company, at the time 
she spoke. The second speaker 
is Charlene Baskett, a member 
of the Progressive Labor Party 
who is currently receiving wel- 
fare for her three children. 

11:30 

PANORAMA OF 
SWEDISH MUSIC 
Franz Berwald : Sinfonie 

Capricieuse. 
Radio Sweden. 

12:00 

FOREIGN STUDY FOR 
AMERICAN STUDENTS 
Three program directors for 
the Institute of European Stu- 
dies discuss the challenge of a 
college year abroad: Gilbert 
Sauvage of the University of 
Paris; Manuel Medina Ortega 
of the University of Madrid, 
and Frank C. Spooner of the 
University of Durham. The 
moderator is Kenneth Ncrth- 
cott of the University of Chi- 
cago. (Conversations at Chica- 
go) 

12:30 

CHINA CONVERSATIONS: 
China and the United Nations 
Elmore Jackson, Vice Presi- 
dent for the United Nations 
Association Policy Studies Pro- 
gram, answers questions con- 
cerning the Chinese represen- 
tation issue at the U.N. 



Something for 
Everyone . . . 



at Books Unlimited 
Co-op 

1550Shattuck 
3000 Telegraph 
Berkeley 

841-5795 




1:00 

A CONCERT FROM 
RADIO BELGIUM 
Adrien Willaert: Three 

Ricercari for Orchestra 
Charles- Joseph Van Helmont: 

Accensa Furore 
With soloists and members of 
the Tornacum Choral Society 
and the "XVI" choir with the 
Belgian National Orchestra un- 
der the direction of Camille 
D'Hooge. 

1:30 

CHINA CONVERSATIONS: 
Chinese Foreign Policy 
Toward the Third World 
Robert A. Scalapine, professor 
of political science at U.C. 
Berkeley, is interviewed by 
Arlene Posner of the National 
Committee on U.S. -China Re- 
lations. Prof. Scalapine was 
formerly chairman of this com- 
mittee. 

2:00 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 
Hekel Tavares: Concerto for 
Piano and Orchestra 
Souza Lima, piano; Tavares, 
National Radio Symphony 
Orchestra of Brazil. 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Penderecki: Passion According 

to Si. Luke 

Czyz, Cologne Chorus and 

Orchestra 

*Victrola VICS 6015 (79) 
Eskimo Songs from Alaska 

Folkways FE 4069 (until 5:30) 



5:30 

CAVEAT EMPTOR 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Sidney Roger 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 
With Charles Amirkhanian. 
An interview with Martin Koe- 
nig, collector and publisher of 
Balkan folk music. Excerpts 
from Koenig's own record iss- 
ues available only by mail dir- 
ect from his New York offices. 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 
PRESENTS 

3 Great Schnabel Performan- 
ces. 
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 

20 in d, K. 466 
Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 

24 in c, K. 491 
Beethoven: Diabelli Variations 

Op. 120 

11:00 

McCLOSKY'S GOT A BRAN' 

NEW BAG 

The music of guitarists John 

Fahey and Robbie Bashoe. 

12:00 

JURA-PARIS ROAD 

With Charles Shere 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



15 




12 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Sidney Roger. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 
Riley: A Rainbow in 
Curved Air. 

Riley, electronics 

*ColumbiaMS 7315(19) 
Brahms: Symphony No. 1 in c 

Bernstein, N.Y. Philharmonic 

Columbia ML 5602(44) 
Kurdish Music from Western 

Iran. Folkways FE 4103 (22) 
Riley: Poppy Nogood and the 

Phantom Band 

Riley, electronics 

♦Columbia MS 7315(22) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 



11:15 

THE TURBULENT SIXTIES 
The third of four documentar- 
ies produced by WBAI's pub- 
lic affairs dept. from ten years 
of archives. 
III. Race and Poverty 
Produced by Bill Schechner. 
(WBAI) 

12:15 

MUSIC FROM THE 

HOLLAND FESTIVAL 1969 

I. NCRV(radio) Vocal Ensem- 
ble conducted by Marinus 
Voorberg. 

Ton De Leeuw: Lamento Pads 
for choir of 16 voices and 
nine instruments, based on 
texts from Guere la Pads, by 
Erasmus (1517). World Prem- 
iere. 

II. Percussion Group of 
Amsterdam 

Milan Stibilj: Epervier de ta 
faiblesse, based on poem by 
Henri Michaux. Soloist, 
Anton Gelderman (recitation) 

Simeon Ten Holt: Tripticon 
World Premiere 

Tona Scherchen: Shen 
World Premiere 



1:30 

FROM THE MIDWAY 
Sidney Davidson, professor of 
accounting in the University 
of Chicago's graduate school 
of business, speaking on "An 
Accountant Looks at Conglo- 
merates". In the second part 
of this program, aesthetician 
Michael Polanyi, professor e- 
meritus from Oxford, discus- 
ses "Duality in Representative 
Art". (From the Midway) 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

5:30 

CHINESE PRESS REVIEW 

Jeanette Hermes 

5:45 

MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Robert Tideman 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night' 

news. 

7:30 

ODE TO GRAVITY 
Rebroadcast of the Wednesday 
night show with Charles Amir- 
khanian. 



8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Robert Tideman. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

THE ART OF THE 13-MINUTE 

PERFORMANCE 

MOZART: 

Mozart: Serenata Notturna, 

K. 239. Maag, London 

Symphony Orchestra 

♦London STS 15088(13) 
Pezel: Suite: "Delitiae musicales 

(Lusl-musik)" Kehr, Mainz 

Chamber Orchestra 

♦Turnabout TV 34274 (13) 
Haydn: Trio No. 60 in A 

Koch, baryton viol; Koch, 

viola; Buhl, cello 

♦Victrola VICS 14 25 (13) 



s S 11:30 



Beethoven: Leonore Overture 
No. 2. Munch, Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
♦Victrola VICS 1471 (13) 
Beethoven: Leonore Overture 
No. 3. Munch, Boston 
Symphony Orchestra 
♦Victrola VICS 1471 (13) 
Nielsen: Helios Overture 
Martinon, Chicago Symphony 
♦Victor LSC 2958(13) 
Bach: Brandenburg Concerto 
No. 2. I Musici; 
M. Andre, trumpet 
♦Philips PHS 2-912(13) 
Druckman: Incenlers (1968) 
Weisberg, Contemporary 
Chamber Ensemble 
♦Nonesuch H 71221 (13) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

ABORTION: DENIAL OF 
OUR RIGHTS 

Cheriel Jensen, an architect 
and a member of the Califor- 
nia Committee to Legalize 
Abortion, speaking at a teach- 
in on the oppression of women 
at San Francisco State College 
on Dec. 10, 1969. 



PANORAMA OF SWEDISH 
MUSIC 

Franz Berwald: Symphony 
in E-flat. (Radio Sweden) 

12:00 

THE VALUE OF PSYCHOTIC 
EXPERIENCE. SANITY, 
MADNESS, BLOWOUT 
CENTER, PART II 
Continuing the talk by Ronald 
Laing of the Esalen Institute 
on establishing a supportive 
environment for the psychotic. 

1:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

2:15 

BOOKS TO BUY, 

BORROW OR BURN 

Molly McDevitt, Promotion 

Director at WBAI reviews The 

Four Gated City by Doris 

Lessing. (Alfred A. Knopf) 

(WBAI) 



7:00 

VARIOUS FOLK 

With ex-stage and screen 

star, Larry Bartlett. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 



9:15 

BRECHT AND ST. JOAN OF 
THE STOCKYARDS 
Eric Bentley introduces ex- 
cerpts from a 1932 German 
radio production of the Brecht 
play, St. Joan of the Stock 
yards. Players are Carola Naher, 
Peter Lorre, Helene Weigel and 
Fritz Kortner. 

10:30 

THE INCARCERATION OF 
REV. CLENNON WASHING- 
TON KING 

An interview with Peler Haber- 
feld, an attorney with Califor- 
nia Rural Legal Assistance, a- 
bout the case of Rev. King, 
who has been in prison for 4 
years on a charge of failure to 
support his minor children. 
The interviewer is Elsa Knight 
Thompson. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



y/kick Our # 



2:30 

JUST YOU AND ME 
Joan Baez Harris, addressing 
members of Pi Chi, a young 
person's organization at the 
Piedmont Community Church 
in the East Bay. On the pre- 
ceding Sunday, the group had 
heard Dr. John Hadsel deliver 
a talk entitled "The Just War" 
and Joan was presented in or- 
der to balance the perspective. 
Recorded April 20, 1969, and 
rebroadcast on request. 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

CHORAL MUSIC 

Roger Reynolds: Quick Are 

The Mouths of Earth 

Weisberg, Contemporary 

Chamber Choir 

♦Nonesuch H 71219 (20) 
Desprez : Missa A ve Maris 

Stella. Hunter, U. Illinois 

Chamber Choir 

♦Nonesuch H 71216 (21) 
Gounod: Saint Cecilia Mass 

Lorengar, soprano; Harte- 

mann, Paris Conservatory 

Orchestra 

♦Angel S 36214 (45) 



16 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



Henze: Whispers of Heavenly 

Death. Henze, RIAS Choir 

and Orchestra 

*DGG 139 373(9) 
Bach: Cantata No. 158, "Der 

Friede SeiMit Dir" 

Gorvin, Hanover Chamber 

Choir 

Archive ARC 3104 (11) 

5:30 

REVIEW OF BRITISH 

WEEKLIES 

5:45 

SCIENCE REPORT 

J. Dennis Lawrence 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
George Brunn 



7:00 

CAL ARTS-DISNEY'S 
DOUGH TAKES FLIGHT 
Third in a series of programs 
on the new school of the arts 
soon to open in Southern 
California. See highlights, 
page 7. 

8:00 

SHAKESPEARE'S MUCH 

ADO ABOUT NOTHING 

The National Theater of Great 

Britain presents Franco Zeffi- 

relli's production, with Albert 

Finney, Lynn Redgrave, and 

Maggie Smith. 

RCA Victor Stereo VDS-104 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



841-OPOZ 



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6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



PHJLIP SCHLETTER, O.D. 

3031 Telegraph Ave. Suite 230 

Berkeley/By Appointment Only 

Berk. Central Medical Bldg. 849-2202 



it 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

8:00 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, George Brunn. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF BRITISH 

WEEKLIES 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

program. 

9:00 

PLANET BALLUNAR 
Poems Falling 
Wonderful (selections) 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK 

SAMPLER 

With Ellyn Beaty 

11:15 

MORNING CONCERT 

Julian White: Homage a 

Mompou. White, piano 

*KPFAtape(3) 
Jakob Jez: Do Fraig Amors 

(cantata). Lebic, Ljubljana 

Chorale 

KPFA tape (15) 
Kuhlau: Quintet for Flute 

and Strings in D. Cologne 

Chamber Music Circle 
*KPFAtape(27) 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES OF A 

REBEL 

With Ben Legere 

12:30 
BOOKS 
Kenneth Rexroth 




1:00 

HOW MANY PEOPLE CAN 
WE AFFORD?: HOW MANY 
IS TOO MANY? 
A public symposium at UC 
Berkeley on the economic as- 
pects of population growth, 
sponsored by the Northern 
California Committee for En- 
vironmental Information on 
Jan. 14, 1970. The principal 
speakers were Economics Pro- 
fessor Abba P. Lerner, UC 
Berkeley; Biology Professor 
Paul Ehrlich of Stanford, 
author of The Population 
Bomb; and Charles T. Travers, 
Vice President for Commer- 
cial Land Development for 
Utah Construction and Mining 
Company. 

3:15 

INTRODUCING THE 

MUSIC OF FRANZ 

BERWALD 

A documentary produced by 

Swedish Radio. 

3:30 

THIN AIR 

Recent developments in the 

arts and conversations with 

visiting artists. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES WITH 

With 

ANTHONY BOUCHER 
Four Singers of the early 20th 
Century. 



5:00 

THE GERMAN FILM: A 
CONVERSATION WITH 
LOTTIE EISNER 
Harold Reynolds, KPFA's 
German press reviewer, talks 
with Lottie Eisner, author of 
The Haunted Screen, a defini- 
tive study of German expres- 
sionist cinema, about the de- 
velopment of cinema in Ger- 
many and some of the great 
German film-makers including 
Ernst Lubitsch, G.W. Pabst, 
Fritz Lang, Josef von Stern- 
berg. Miss Eisner is also author 
of a book on F.W. Murnau 
soon to be published by the 
U.C. Press. 

6:00 

FRENCH NEWS ANALYSIS 

Prepared and read in French 

by Pierre Idiart, editor of the 

weekly newspaper, he 

Californien. 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

CABRILLO FESTIVAL 1969 

Haydn: Divertimento No. 1 in 
e 

Hindemith: Chamber Music 
for Five Winds. Amici Wood- 
wind Quintet 

Mozart: Quartet for Flute and 
Strings in C, ft. 285b. Janet 
Millard, flute with the Pro 
Arte Quartet 

Andrew Imbrie: Quartet No. 2 
(1953). The Pro Arte Quartet 



If 



Maurice Ravel: Songs of Mada- 
gascar. Helene Joseph, sopra- 
no; Janet Millard, flute; Allen 
Gove, cello; Richard Sogg, 
piano 

Hosted by Warren Van Orden. 

8:30 

ABOLISH THE PEACE 
CORPS! 

A panel discussion with three 
former Peace Corps volun- 
teers: Joseph Sklar, Bonnie 
Strote and Fran Ryan, of the 
Committee of Returned Vol- 
unteers. Elsa Knight Thomp- 
son, KPFA's ProgramDirector, 
moderates. 

9:30 

BLACK VOICES OF THE 70's 
Adam David Miller, editor of 
an anthology of poetry by 
black poets, to be published 
shortly under the title Dices 
or Black Bones, talks with 
four of the poets included: 
Al Young, Bill Anderson, 
Patricia Parker and Sara Web- 
ster Fabio. Eleanor Sully in- 
troduces Mr. Miller. 

10:15 

"VENCEREMOS!" 
An interview with Julie Nicha- 
man, of the National Commit- 
tee of the Venceremos Brigade, 
recently returned from Cuba. 
She is interviewed by Lincoln 
Bergman. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



17 



[c 



Ul 



dibit 



c ^s*rt| 15 M>» 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast 



of last night's 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 
MUSIC FROM LOUISVILLE 
Britten: Concerto No. 1 for 

Violin and Orchestra, Op. 15 

Kling, violin solo 
Ben-Haim: Pastorale Variee 

for Clarinet Solo, Harp and 

Strings 
Hovhaness: Symphony No. 15, 

"Silver Pilgrimmage" Op. 199 

(1963) 
Kurka: Symphony No. 2, 

Op. 24 (1953) 
Ben-Haim: To the Chief 

Musician (Metamorphoses 

for Orchestra) 
Riegger: Variations for Violin 

and Orchestra, Op. 71 

Harth, violin sojo 
Harris: Kentucky Spring 
Louisville Orchestra under the 
direction of Robert Whitney. 
Hosted by Richard Friedman. 

11:00 

♦JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

BENEFIT FOR THE 
INDIANS ON ALCATRAZ: 
DEC. 12, 1969 

A recording of a benefit per- 
mance held in Stanford Uni- 
versity's Memorial Chapel. The 
Chapel was crowded with sup- 
porters of the Alcatraz Project 
who had come to hear Malvina 
Reynolds and Buffy St. Marie 
sing for a cause to which both 
are deeply committed. 



2:30 

POEMS BY DANIEL 
LANGTON 

Daniel J. Langton reads from 
his own work. A San Francis- 
can, Mr. Langton has been a 
member of the English and 
Creative Writing Departments 
at San Francisco State for two 
years. His poems have appear- 
ed in a number of magazines 
including the Nation, the Paris 
Review, Poetry and the At- 
lantic Monthly. 

3:00 

TALES OF HOFFMAN 
Jacques Offenbach 
An opera in three acts to a li- 
bretto by Jules Barbier. The 
RAI Orchestra and Chorus of 
Milan is conducted by Lee 
Schaynen. The Chorus master 
is Roberto Benaglio, with a 
cast featuring Pierette Alairie, 
Suzanne Danco, Lucretia West, 
Leopold Simoneau, Renato 
Capecchi, Enzio De Giorgi, 
Dezsoe Ernster, Renato Ces- 
ari, Robert Destain and George 
London. 
Presented by Melvin Jahn. 

5:30 

VIEWS AND REVIEWS 

Eleanor Sully 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



7:00 

COMMENTARY 
Steve Murdock 





THE 



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7:15 

CABRILLO FESTIVAL 1969 

Anton Webern: Five Move- 
ments for Strings 

Franz Schubert: String 
Quartet No. 13 in a , Op. 29 
Pro Arte Quartet 

Mozart: Sonata for Bassoon 
and 'cello, K. 292. Jerry 
Dagg, bassoon; Allen Gove, 
'cello 

Prokofieff : Quintet for Wind 
and Strings, Op. 39. Amici 
Chamber Ensemble 

Hosted by Warren Van Orden 

8:45 

THE U.C. CHILD CARE 
PROGRAM 

A panel discussion of the AS- 
UC child-care project at U.C. 
Berkeley. Participants are Bill 
Plumb, Reggie Sedgwick, and 
Kathie Beers of the governing 
board of the project; Mary 
Jefferds of Prytanean Alum- 
nae, Inc.; and Sharon Gron- 
ningen, student-mother of two 
children. The moderator is 
Elsa Knight Thompson. Re- 
corded January 13, 1970. 



9:30 

"OCCUPANT: 47 ROSEMUND 

WAY" BY ALLAN MICHAEL 

FRANKEL 

Frankel reads his own story, 

which is published in this 

month's Folio. 

10:00 

*STAYS FRESH LONGER 
A program of popular music, 
much of which was recorded 
at Fillmore West and the Ma- 
trix, and some originating live 
in our studios. Produced by 
Marc, Warren, Lauren, and 
Leon. 




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DEATH OF THE APE MAN 
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ROMAN POLANSKY'S: CUL 
DE SAC & REPULSION 



HALLELUJAH THE HILLS 
THE KNACK 

MARCH 25-31 BIZARRE BIZARRE 
VOLPONE 

these features will appear in studio B. for studio A, 
check local listings. write for brcK'hurc 




1828 Cuclib 
841-2648 



18 



KPFA FOLK). ..MARCH 1970 



MONDAY 



MONDAY 



b 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 



7:30 

STRANGE LANDS AND 
FRIENDLY PEOPLE 
Music of Peru, with 
Doreen Hansen. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Steve Murdock. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

FIVE GREAT FIVES 

Haydn: Symphony No. 5 in A 
(1760). Goberman, Vienna 
State Opera Orchestra 
Odyssey 3216 0033 (16) 

Mozart: Symphony No. 5 in 
B flat (1765). Leinsdorf, 
London Philharmonic 
Westminster XWN 18861(7) 

Vaughan Williams: Symphony 
No. 5(1943). Boult, London 
Philharmonic Orchestra 
London LL 975 (36) 

Martinu: Symphony No. 5 
(1946). Whitney, Louisville 
Orchestra 
♦Louisville LS 663 (24) 

Honegger: Symphony No. 5 
(1951). Baudo, Czech Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra 
Crossroads 2216 0077 (22) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

INTERVIEW WITH DIANE 

PIAZOLLA, 

whose husband is serving a 

five year prison sentence in 

Alabama for possession of 26 

marijuana seeds. Bill Schech- 

ner is the interviewer. 

(WBAI) 



TUESDAY 
AVdSMl 




11:45 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 
Heitor Villa-Lobos: Second 
Suite Infanlil, Carnaval das 
Crianacas Brasileiras, As Tres 
Maries, Guia Pratico. 
Performed by pianist Sonia 
Maria. 
12:15 

THE PREGNANT GHETTO 
Ghetto action is the motive 
behind the newly formed 
Economic Resources Corpora- 
tion, and Richard Allen is the 
man behind the corporation. 
His plan is to put life into de- 
pressed urban areas by bring- 
ing in industry, jobs and low- 
cost housing. At a 
meeting at the Center for the 
Study of Democratic Institu- 
tions, he discusses these views 
with Leon Sager, businessman, 
Jay Jackson, executive direc- 
tor of the Economic Resour- 
ces Corporation, and Center 
Fellows. 

1:00 

PANORAMA OF SWEDISH 
MUSIC 

Hilding Rosenberg: The Con- 
science of Contemporary 
Swedish Music. 
(Radio Sweden) 

1:30 

SYMPOSIUM ON TRADI- 
TIONAL AFRICAN ART 
HELD AT THE HAMPTON 
INSTITUTE 

On this program will be heard 
the fourth session of the sym- 
posium. Jan Vansina, of the 
Univ. of Wisconsin, speaks on 
"Kuba Art and Its Cultural 
Context", Prof. Eugene Grigs- 
by, Arizona State College, 
speaks on "The Esthetics of 
Kuba Masks", (an additional 
interview with him is also pre- 
sented), and James E. Lewis, 
of Morgan State College, 
speaks on "Varieties of Sculp- 
tural Form in Senufo Helmet 
Masks". 
(WBAI) 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

TUESDAY MORNING CLUB 

With Julian White 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Lewis F. 
Sherman. 



3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Froberger: Clavichord works 

Dart, clavichord 

L'Oiseau-Lyre OL 50207(56) 
Bartok: Etudes, Op. 18 

Rosen, piano 

Epic LC 3878 (8) 
Mozart: Concerto No. 6 for 

Piano and Orchestra 

Ashkenazy, piano; Schmidt- 

Isserstedt, London Symphony 

Orchestra 

♦London CS 6579(21) 
Bach: Suite No. 5 in G 

Backhaus, piano 
♦London STS 15065 (15) 
Liszt: Sonnette No. 104 del 

Petrarca. Rosen, piano 

Epic LC 3878 (6) 

5:30 

CONFRONTATION 

WASHINGTON 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Lewis F. Sherman 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

William Mandel 

7:15 

NEW MUSIC PREVIEW 
Tonight Howard Hersh pre- 
sents a discussion and preview 
of the San Francisco Conser- 
vatory's New Music Ensemble 
concert to be held on March 
20. The concert will feature 
AOK for violinists, chorus, 
conductors and accordion 
soloist by Pauline Oliveros; 
False Relationships and the 
Extended Ending by Morton 
Feldman; Bacchanale for pre- 
pared piano by John Cage; and 
the world premieres of works 
written for the ensemble by 
Christopher Lantz and Ivan 
Tcherepnin. 



>&££$$ ;££ 



8:45 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

program with William Mandel. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Nielsen: Symphony No. 1 

(1892). Previn, London 

Symphony Orchestra 

♦Victor LSC 2961 (36) 
Rachmaninoff: Symphony 

No. 3, Op. 44. Kletzki, 

Suisse Romande 

♦London CS 6622 (41) 
Grieg: Holberg Suite, Op. 40 

Som.^ry, English Chamber 

Orchestra 

♦Cardinal VCS 10067 (24) 



17 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

THE TURBULENT SIXTIES 

The last of four documentaries 

produced by WBAI's public 

affairs dept. from ten years of 

archives. 

IV. Assassinations and 

Violence, produced by Bob 

Kuttner 

(WBAI) 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

FEINSTEIN AND GIANNI 
BISIACH IN LOCARNO: 
THE TWO KENNEDYS 
See March 4th, at 1:00 pm. 

9:45 

NEW OUTLOOK 
An interview with Mr. Simha 
Flapan, editor of the Israeli 
magazine New Outlook which 
editorially attempts an Arab- 
Israeli rapprochment. Carle- 
ton Goodlett, San Francisco 
physician and editor of the 
Sun Reporter joins KPFA's 
Elsa Knight Thompson in this 
talk with Mr. Flapan. 

10:30 

♦WORDS 

A program of new poetry and 

word art produced by Clark 

Coolidge. 

11:30 

EXPERIMENTS IN ART 
AND TECHNOLOGY 
With Richard Friedman 

,12:00 
'♦INFORMATION, 

TRANSMISSION, 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

With Richard Friedman 




Fine arts, crafts, design. BFA, MFA, 
B. Art Ed. degrees. Catalog on request 



CALIFORNIA COLLEGE 
OF ARTS AND CRAFTS 

5212 HOAOWAT, OAKLAND, CALIF. • 01 3-1111 



12:15 

A CONCERT FROM EAST 

GERMAN RADIO 

J.S. Bach: Cantata No. 31 
The Thomaner Choir, with 
members of the Gewandhaus 
Orchestra, conducted by Er- 
hard Mauersberger 

Old Choir Music: Choirs of 
the German Democratic 
Republic 

Bach: Cantata No. 45 
Mauersberger, Thomaner 
Choir, members of Gewand- 
haus Orchestra 

Old Choir Music: Choirs of the 
German Democratic Rep. 

Bach: Cantata No. 135 
Mauersberger, Thomaner 
Choir, members of Gewand- 
haus Orchestra 



KPFA FOLIO...MARCH 1970 



19 



TUESDAY 



TUESDAY 



TUESDAY 



2:15 

BOOKS TO BUY, 
BORROW OR BURN 
Gil Jardine, Drama Editor for 
University Review reviews To- 
wards A Poor Theatre by J. 
Grotowski. 
(Simon & Schuster) 
(WBAI) 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 



5:00 

IRISH SONGS AND 
HISTORY 

With the Singing Lady, Bar- 
bara Tabler of Berkeley. In 
honor of St. Patrick's Day. 

5:30 

GERMAN PRESS REVIEW 

Harold Reynolds 

5:45 

DRAMA & LITERATURE 

REVIEW 

Eleanor Sully 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Jack Morrison 



6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

7:30 

FILM REVIEW 

Margo Skinner 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

A LEISURELY TOUR 

THROUGH KEYBOARD 

LITERATURE 

Pianist Julian White performs 

live from the KPFA studios 

on Shattuck Avenue. 



10:15 

THE NEW WOMAN 
A panel discussion with Steph- 
anie Mills of Planned Parent- 
hood, Mimi Kaprolat of NOW 
(National Organization of Wo- 
men), Patricia Maginnis of the 
Association to Repeal Abor- 
tion Laws, and Alvin Duskin, 
San Francisco manufacturer 
of women's clothing. The eve- 
ning is moderated by Eugene 
Schoenfeld, otherwise known 
in his S.F. Chronicle column 
as Dr. Hippocrates. 

12:00 

♦INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

Avant-garde jazz with DeLeon 

Harrison. 



^EDNESDAY18 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Jack Morrison. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Takemitsu: Green for 
Orchestra. Ozawa, Toron- 
to Symphony 
♦Victor LSC 3099 (6) 

Respighi: Pines of Rome 
Kertesz, London Symphony 
Orchestra 
♦London CS 6624 (21) 

Mozart: Symphony No. 29 
Davis, Sinfonia of London 
♦Victrola VICS 1378(23) 

Schubert: 4 Impromptus 
Kraus, piano 
♦Cardinal VCS 10031 (30) 

CPE. Bach: Harpsichord Con- 
certo in d. Leonhardt, 
harpsichord; Collegium 
Aureum 
♦Victrola V1CS 1463(22) 

Takemitsu: Dorian Horizon 
Ozawa, Toronto Symphony 
♦Victor LSC 3099(9) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

KEITH BARNES READS 
HIS POEMS 

Recorded in Paris, Keith Bar- 
nes reads poems written dur- 
ing the year 1967, subsequent 
to the publication of his book, 
Born To Flying Glass. Three 
of Mr. Barnes' unpublished 
poems are printed in the 
March Folio. 
KPFA Archives, 1967. 

12:00 

ROBERT SCHUMANN: DIE 
ALTEN LIEBEN LIEDER 
Part 2 of two programs of lie- 
der and piano works of Robert 
Schumann arranged by Elly 
Ameling and Jorg Demus. 
Von Blumen und Baumen 
Von Marchen, Hexen und 
Wanrsagerinnen 
Elly Ameling, soprano, is 
heard with Jorg Demus, piano. 
Hosted by Larry Jackson 
(in stereo). 

1:00 

DO WOMEN DARE? 

A panel at the New School 

with Rep. Shirley Chisolm 

(D— NY), Gloria Steinem, and 

Mrs. Jacqueline Grennan 

Wexler. 

(WBAI) 



2:00 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 
Luiz Cosme: Suite from 
Salamanca do Jarau 
Cosme, National Radio 
Symphony Orch of Brazil 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 
Mendelssohn: Saint Paul 
(oratorio), Op. 36. Gross- 
man, Pro Musica Sym. 
Vienna 
♦Vox SVUX 52006 (105) 

5:30 

MILITARY MONITOR 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Ben Seaver 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

Charles Amirkhanian 

THE MELODIOUS 

KEYPUNCH 

Dello Joio: Sonata No. 3 for 

Piano (1947). Glazer, 

piano 

Concert-Disc M 1217 

il 



Barber: Four Excursions, 

Op. 20(1944). Previn, piano 

Columbia ML 5639 
Stravinsky: Sonata for Two 

Pianos (1945). Gold and 

Fizdale, pianos 

Columbia ML 5733 
Shapero: Sonata for Piano 

Four Hands (1941). Shapero 

and Smit, piano 

Columbia ML 4841 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 

PRESENTS 

Kajanus conducts Sibelius 

Karelia Suite: Intermezzo and 

Alia Marcia 
Symphony No. 3, 
Symphony No. 2 

10:30 

SURPLUS PROPHETS 

12:00 
♦SOURCE 

Produced by Larry Austin, 
Arthur Woodbury and Stan 
Lunetta, editors of the avant- 
garde music periodical, Source 
Magazine. 



oiuGit?aL ptupes 



2120 N inr SI 
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20 



A NIGHT OF INDIAN LORE 
with film and dance 
featuring students from 
the Indian club of Stewart, Nevada 

VVALDEN CENTER SCHOOL 
Dwight & McKinley 

Saturday, March 21 
2 shows- 7:30 & 9:00 PM 
(I mBtion: adults $2.00 information: 655-3919 

students $1.00 or 642-4799 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 



7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Ben Seaver. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Reger: Suite No. 1 for Solo 
Viola. Trampler, viola 
♦Victor LSC 2974 (13) 

Chopin: Sonata No. 3 in b. 
Op. 58. Lipatti, piano 
Odyssey 3216 0369 (25) 

Sibelius: Violin Concerto in d 
Perlman, violin; Leinsdorf, 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 
♦Victor LSC 2962(29) 

Boccherini: Cello Concerto 
Janigro, cello; I Solisti de 
Zagreb 
♦Victrola VICS 1433 (22) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

SOCIAL PERCEPTIONS OF 
POPULATION CHANGE IN 
INDIA 

Myron Weiner, professor of 
political science at Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, 
discusses population trends 
within Indian society. Ken 
Pierce, lecturer in humanities 



19 




e£& 



at the University of Chicago 

is host. 

(Conversations at Chicago.) 

11:45 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 

Brenno Blauth: Trio 

Wilhelm Martin, violin; 

Antonio Vincente, 'cello; 

Luis Castro, piano 

12:00 

CHINA CONVERSATIONS: 

China's Historic Relations 

with S. E. Asia 

Claude A. Buss, professor of 

history at Stanford University, 

is interviewed by Arlene Pos- 

ner of the National Committee 

on U.S.— China Relations. 

12:30 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 
Claudio Santoro: Symphony 
No. 5. Santoro, National 
Symphony Orchestra. 

1:00 

WHATEVER BECAME OF.... 
ANDRE EGLEVSKY? 
The Russian-born dancer re- 
lates stories about the world 
of ballet and his appearance 
in the Charlie Chaplin film 
Limelight. Eglevsky will be 
featured in the third What- 
ever Became of . . .? book to 
be published this Fall by 
Crown Publishers. 
(WBAI) 



1:30 

TENANT UNIONS TODAY 
Three social workers from the 
University of Chicago School 
of Social Service Administra- 
tion discuss tenant union or- 
ganizing: Joshua Cohen, assis- 
tant professor; Melvin Gold- 
berg, attorney and research 
associate; and Janet Bruin, a 
graduate student. Moderator 
is Ken Pierce, lecturer in hu- 
manities at the University of 
Chicago. 
(Conversations at Chicago.) 

2:00 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 

Music of Oscar Lorenzo 

Fernandez 

Three Studies in the Form of 

a Sonatina. Robert Tavares, 

piano 
Four Songs: Tapera, Noturno, 

Meu Coracao, Negra Fulo. 

Maria de Lourdes Cruz 

Lopes, soprano, with 

Gerardo Parente, piano 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

5:30 

JAPANESE PRESS REVIEW 

Richard Lock 



5:45 

MUSIC REVIEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
to be announced 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

MUSIC IN AMERICA 

Chris Strachwitz 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:15 

THE PERSON OF 
TOMORROW 

A lecture by Carl Rogers, given 
in San Francisco on January 9, 
1970 under the sponsorship of 
Esalen Institute. Dr. Rogers, 
a clinical psychologist, is pres- 
ently a Resident Fellow at 
the Center for Studies of the 
Person, La Jolla. 

10:00 

THE BURROW: BY FRANZ 
KAFKA 

Kafka's nightmare tale about 
an underground animal who 
has spent his life trying to 
keep his house secure. Per- 
formed as a monologue by 
Erik Bauersfeld. 
(KPFA Archives, 1967.) 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 2 FRIDAY 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 
20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 20 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

ODE TO GRAVITY 
Rebroadcast of March 18th 
program, with Charles Amirk- 
hanian. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Webern: Passacaglia, Op. 1 

Craft, conductor 

Columbia K4L 232 (10) 
Schumann: Symphonic Eludes, 

Op. 13. Browning, piano 

♦Victor LSC 2963 (27) 
Rameau: Les Indes Galantes 

(ballet suite). Collegium 

Aureum 

♦Victrola VICS 1456 (37) 
Ginastera: Piano Concerto 

Martins, piano; Leinsdorf, 

Boston Symphony 

♦Victor LSC 3029 (23) 

KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

THE BUDAPEST CHILDRENS 

CHOIR 

The second concert from 

Magyar Radio. 

12:00 

THE VALUE OF 
PSYCHOTIC EXPERIENCE- 
SANITY, MADNESS, 
BLOWOUT CENTER 
The third part of a continuing 
discussion by Ronald D. Laing 
of the Esalen Institute on 
establishing a supportive en- 
vironment for the psychotic. 

1:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

2:15 

DANCE REVIEW 

With Betty Roszak 



2:30 

MUSIC FROM BRAZIL 
Hekel Tavares: Concerto for 
violin and orchestra. Oscar 
Borgarth, violin; Tavares, 
National Radio Symphony 
Orchestra of Brazil 

3:00 

CHINA CONVERSATIONS: 
China's Foreign Policy-Its 
Implications for the Future 
An interview with Richard L. 
Walker, professor of Inter- 
national Relations and Direc- 
tor of the Institute of Inter- 
national Studies at the Uni- 
versity of South Carolina. The 
interviewer is Arlene Posner 
of the National Committee on 
U.S. -China Relations. 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Subotnick : Silver Apples of 
the Moon. Electronic music 
♦Nonesuch H 71174 (32) 

Schoenberg: Ode to Napoleon 
Buonaparte for Siring Quar- 
tet, Piano and Narrator, Op.41 
Claremont Quartet ensemble 
♦Nonesuch H 71186(15) 



Muthuswami Dikshitar: Kriti— 

Minakshi 

Nonesuch H 72019(15) 
Stravinsky: LesNoces 

Stravinsky, Columbia Ensem- 
ble 

♦Columbia MS 6372(25) 
Stravinsky: Renard; Ragtime 

for 11 Instruments 

Stravinsky, Columbia 

Ensemble 

♦Columbia MS 6372(20) 

5:30 

REVIEW OF 
BRITISH WEEKLIES 



5:45 

REPORT TO THE LISTENER 

Al Silbowitz 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Henry Anderson 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



21 



FRIDAY 



FRIDAY 



FRIDAY 



7:00 
SCOPE 

Four members of a new group 
called SCOPE, the Student 
Council on Pollution and the 
Environment, talk to Denny 
Smithson about their organi- 
zation and what they hope to 
accomplish. SCOPE has been 
formed under the auspices of 
the Department of the Inter- 
ior, through the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Administra- 
tion, and therefore has some 
part of the ear of the current 
administration. The interview 
was recorded January 16th, 
and Denny introduces the 
program. 

8:00 

THE GLASS MENAGERIE 
BY TENNESSEE WILLIAMS 
Williams' "memory play" di- 
rected by Howard Sackler, 
with Montgomery Cliff, Julie 
Harris, Jessica Tandy and 
David Wayne. 
(*Caedmon TRS-S-301) 



9:30 

CABRILLO FESTIVAL 1969 
The concert given Saturday 
evening, August 23, 1969. 
Mozart: Overture to the 

Marriage of Figaro 
Carlos Chavez: Symphony 

No. 5 for Strings 
Francis Poulenc: Aubade 
Mozart: Symphony No. 41 

(Jupiter), K. 551 
Williams, Amici Delia Musica 

Orchestra 
*Hosted by Warren Van Orden. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



Vth dTrornaac 

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Eid Brown, Chef de Gulsine 



2:00 

THE HERCULES 

GRYTPYPE-THYNNE 

SHOW 




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21 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Henry Anderson. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF 
BRITISH WEEKLIES 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
program. 

9:00 

PLANET BALLUNAR 
Betty Dineen is caught in 
The March Winds. 

11:00 

CHILDRENS' BOOK 
SAMPLER 
Ellyn Beaty 

11:15 

MORNING CONCERT 

BACH'S BIRTHDAY 

CONCERT 

Bach: Concerto No. 1. Richter 

piano; Talich, Czech Phil. 

Artia ALP 123(25) 
Bach : Concerto No. 1 in a, for 

Violin, Strings and Continuo 

S( hneiderhan, violin; Baum- 

gartner, Lucerne Festival 

Orchestra 

Archive ARC 3099 (14) 



12:00 

WHAT IS EPILEPSY? 
An interview with Dr. Douglas 
L. Crowther, who is assistant 
administrative director of the 
Northern California Epilepsy 
Program at the U.C. Medical 
Center in San Francisco and 
also an associate clinical pro- 
fessor of neurology and pedi- 
atrics at U.C. Elsa Knight 
Thompson, KPFA's program 
director, conducts the inter- 



22 



12:30 

BOOKS 

Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

AMERICAN CITY 

PLANNING 

Mel Scott, author of the new 

University of California Press 

book of the above title, talks 

with Elsa Knight Thompson. 

1:30 

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF 
The performers are the stu- 
dents of Harry A. Eiseman Jr. 
High School in the Brownsville 
section of Brooklyn. They are 
black, white, and Puerto Ri- 
can. The director, the head of 
the school's music department, 
is Richard Piro. This produc- 
tion has received much publi- 
city and was the subject of 
ABC-TV's hour program Sum- 
mer Focus. This production 
took place last Spring, 1969. 
This program was produced 
for WBAI by Milton Hoffman. 



3:30 

THIN AIR 

Recent developments in the 

arts and conversations with 

visiting artists. 

4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES WITH 
ANTHONY BOUCHER 
Juste Nivette, Bass 

5:00 

SPECIAL LENTEN PROGRAM 

Ambrosian Chant: Choir of 

the Polifonica Ambrosiana, 

Milan/Biella 
Soto: // pietoso Gesu. L. 

Ticinelli-Fattori, soprano; 

Adriano Ferrario, tenor 
Cherubini: Sonata for 2 

Organs. Earl Ness, William 

Whitehead 
Vivaldi: Introduction (II) to 

a Miserere. Aafije Haynis, 

contralto; I Solisti di Milano, 

Ephrikian 
Giovanni Gabrieli: Motet "O 

Domine Jesu Chrisle". 

Choir of the Gabrieli Festi- 
val, Appia 
Albinoni: Sonata for Strings 

and Continuo, Op. 2, No. 6, 

I Musici 



6:00 

FRENCH NEWS 

ANALYSIS 

Prepared and read in French 

by Pierre Idiart, editor of the 

weekly newspaper, Le 

Californien. 



6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



7:00 

WOMANKIND 

Commentary and discussion 

from the feminist community. 

(WBAI) 

7:30 

CABRILLO FESTIVAL 1969 
The final concert given Aug- 
ust 24, 1969. 

Honegger: Pastorale D'Ete 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 

in b, Op. 60 
Vivaldi: Concerto for Two 

Oboes 
Carlos Chavez: Discovery 

(world premiere). Williams, 

Amici Delia Musica Orch. 
Hosted bv Warren Van Orden 

9:00 

AN ANTHROPOLOGIST 
VIEWS THE SOCIAL SCENE 
"If you don't hold the frogs in 
the waterfall as sacred as the 
human family, you're doom- 
ed." Anthropologist Gregory 
Bateson (once married to Mar- 
garet Mead) delivered this talk 
Jan. 14, 1970, at the Mental 
Research Institute in Palo 
Alto. One of the conclusions 
in his talk is that the common- 
ly accepted way of looking at 
our world as "Man versus En- 
vironment" will prove abso- 
lutely lethal to a society with 
enough technology to put the 
idea into practice. He gives us 
a 50-50 survival chance with- 
in the next 20 years. 

9:45 

VASHTAI, QUEEN OF 

QUEENS 

A Compendium Production 

written and directed by Jim 

Armstrong with no profund- 

ly serious intent. 

From the KPFA Archives. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 

KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



Sfllll 22 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcasl of last night's 

news. 

8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 
Haydn: The Seasons (com- 
plete). Davis, BBC Chorus 
and Orchestra; Harper, 
Davies, Shirley-Quirk, 
vocalists 
♦Philips 3-911 (140) 

11:00 

♦JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL ELWOOD 

1:00 

ALIENATION 

Kenneth Lillquistand Richard 
Spore, as readers, explore the 
tragedy of alienation through 
selections from literature in- 
cluding Kafka, Melville, Pinter 
and Lawrence, with commen- 
tary from The Sane Society 
by Erich Fromm. Compiled 
by Kenneth Lillquist. 

2:15 

IS THE LIBRARY 

BURNING? 

Roger Rapoport, co-author 



of the book on student un- 
rest of the above title, is 
interviewed by Elsa Knight 
Thompson, KPFA's Program 
Director. 

2:45 

ROBERTO DEVEREUX 
by Gaetano Donizetti. 
An opera in three acts to a lib- 
retto by Salvatore Cammarano 
based on Francois Ancelot's 
tragedy Elisabeth d'Angleterre. 
In this 1969 British E.M.I, stu- 
dio recording, recently issued 
by Westminster, we hear the 
Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tra conducted by Charles Mac- 
kerras, and the Ambrosian 
Opera Chorus, under chorus 
master John McCarthy. The 
cast is: 
Elizabeth, Queen of England 

...Beverly Sills, soprano 
Duke of Nottingham. ..Peter 

Glossop, baritone 
Dutchess of Nottingham... 

Sara Beverly Wolff, mezzo 

soprano 
Robert Devereux, Earl of 

Essex. ..Robert Ilofalvy, 

tenor 
Lord Cecil. ..Kenneth Mac- 
Donald, tenor 



/ ^(\■& 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

STRANGE LANDS AND 
FRIENDLY PEOPLE 
MUSIC OF THE DAN 
Primarily vocal music of the 
Dan people, Ivory Coast, Af- 
rica Produced by Judith Cook. 
Barenreiter BM 30 L 2301 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT 

Boismortier: Daphne el Chloe 

Gerwig, lute; Seiler, conducts 

Heliodor H 25018 (17) 
Dvorak: Serenade for Strings 

Schmidt-Isserstedt, Hamburg 

Radio Orchestra 

♦Heliodor HS 25066 (28) 
Mendelssohn: Octet in E flat, 

Op. 20. Winograd, conducts 

Heliodor H 25021 (29) 
Arne: Judgement of Paris 

Overture. Surinach, 

Conductor 

Heliodor H 25022 (9) 
Dvorak: Serenade for Winds 

Schmidt-Isserstedt, Hamburg 

Radio Orchestra 

♦Heliodor HS 25066 (25) 
Byrd: Fantasie No. I for 

Strings. Surinach, conducts 

Heliodor H 25022(7) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

CHINA CONVERSATIONS: 
Ideology and Politics 
Lucian Pye, professor of poli- 
tical science at the Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology, 
is interviewed about his latest 
book, The Spirit of Chinese 
Politics. The interviewer is 
Arlene Posner of the National 
Committee on U. S.— China 
Relations. 

11:45 

CONCERT OF WORKS BY 
LASZIO LAJTHA 
Given in the Budapest Aca- 
demy of Music 2-21-68, and 
recorded by Magyar Radio. 
Concerto for 'cello and 

piano. Laszlo Mezo, 'cello; 

Lorand Szucs, piano 
Quatre Hommages. Attila 

Lajos, flute; Peter Pongracz, 

oboe; Bela Kovacs, clarinet; 

Tibor Fulemule, bassoon. 
Second harp trio. Henrik 

Rohmann, harp; Attila Jajos, 

flute; Laszlo Mezo, 'cello 
Motet. Judith Sandor, 

soprano; Lorand Szucs, 

piano 
Seventh String Quartet 

Tatrai String Quartet 
Presented by Warren Van Orden' 



Sir Walter Raleigh... Don 

Garrard, bass 
A Page...Gwynne Howell, 

bass 
A Servant of Nottingham... 

Richard Van Allan, bass 
Presented by Melvin Jahn. 
♦Westminster WST 323 

5:30 

VIEWS AND REVIEWS 

Eleanor Sully 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

MUSIC OF KAROL 

SZYMANOWSKI 

First of 5 programs of which 

2 will be heard this month. 

Symphony No. 2 in B-flat, 

Op. 19(1909) 
Symphony No. 3 for Tenor, 

Mixed Chorus and Orchestra 
Song of the Night,Op. 27 

(1915-6) 
Presented by Wanda Tomczy- 
kowska of the Polish Arts and 
Culture Foundation. 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



1:30 

SYMPOSIUM ON TRADI- 
TIONAL AFRICAN ART 
On this program will be heard 
the fifth session of the sympo- 
sium. James A. Porter, of 
Howard University, will speak 
on "Modality of Structure and 
Form in West African Archi- 
tecture," Douglas Fraser, of 
Columbia University, will 
speak on "The Fish-Legged 
Figure in Benin and Yoruba 
Art: Some Further Reflec- 
tions," and Frank Willett, of 
Northwestern University, pre- 
sents a paper, "New Light on 
the Ife-Benin Relationship". 
(WBAI) 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Koussevitsky: Concerto for 

Double Bass & Orchestra 

Karr, bass: Antonini, Oslo 

Philharmonic Orchestra 

♦CRI SD 248 (21) 
Cowell: Symphony No. 16, 

"Icelandic" (1962) 

Strickland, Iceland Symphony 

CRI 179 (23) 
Sessions: Violin Concerto 

(1935), Zukofsky, violin; 

Schuller*ORTF Orchestra 

♦CRI 220 USD (29) 
Hovhaness: Triptych (1952-6) 

Antonini, Bamberg Sym. 

♦CRI 221 USD (22) 
Cowell: Quartet No. 4 (United 

"United". (1936) 

Beaux Arts String Quartet 

CRI 173 (13) 



8:00 

AN EGYPTIAN JEW 
ANSWERS AGOPIAN AND 
EDWARDS 

An interview by Colin Ed- 
wards with Joseph Wahed, 
who formerly resided in Egy- 
pt. This interview was obtain- 
ed at the request of listeners 
to an earlier program of Mr. 
Edwards in which he talked 
with Michel Agopian, Agence 
France Presse correspondent 
in Cairo. 

9:00 

THEATER NEW YORK 
Ann Rivers, producer and mo- 
derator of the program talks 
with June Rovinger, Terry 
Walker, Fred Stewart and Jim 
Pappas about "The Assem- 
bly", a new theater venture. 
(WBAI) 

10:00 

♦STAYS FRESH LONGER 

Tonight we present the second 

half of the Incredible String 

Band concert recorded last 

December at the Fillmore 

West. 



5:30 

JUDICIAL REVIEW 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Henry Ramsey 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

William Mandel 

7:30 

THE MOVIES 

(WBAI) 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

RADIO EVENT NO. 7, 

"JUNK & ALL THAT JAZZ" 

By Anthony Gnazzo 

The radio audience is invited 

to participate. For detailed 

instructions, see the inside 

front cover. 

10:00 
THE PILL 

Dr. Benjamin Majors and Dr. 
Harold Williams speaking at 
U.C. Berkeley Dec. 3, 1969. 
Dr. Majors, from Planned Par- 
enthood Association, takes is- 
sue with the position taken 
by Dr. Williams in his book, 
The Pill: Pregnant or Dead. 



23 



MORE MONDAY 

10:30 

♦WORDS 

A program of new poetry and 

word art produced by Clark 

Coolidge. 

11:30 

EXPERIMENTS IN ART 
AND TECHNOLOGY 
With Richard Friedman 

12:00 

♦INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

With Richard Friedman 



EVERYONE CAN 



SHOP CO-OP 



EVEN KPFA SUBSCRIBERS 



® 



Co-op Centers in 

Berkeley Castro Valley 

El Cerrito 

Walnut Creek Corte Madera 



tOMMY 24 



A Fistful Of 

New Telephone Numbers 

for 

ANDREWS TRAVEL 

BERKELEY 

2440 Bancroft Way 845-7200 
2920 Domingo Ave 845-8800 
1755 Solano Ave 524-7100 

2043 University Ave 848-3700 
CAtL US ANYTIME 

Member American Society of Travel Agents 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

TUESDAY MORNING CLUB 

With Julian White 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Henry Ramsey. 

8:45 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

A rebroadcast with William 

Mandel. 

9:00 

MORNING CONCERT 

Handel: Detlingen Te Deum 

Gonnenwein, SW German 

ensembles 

♦Angel S 36194 (43) 
Jacobi: Cello Concerto (1932) 

Vecchi, cello; Strickland, 

Oslo Philharmonic 

CRI 174 (16) 
Gamelan Music of Java 

♦Nonesuch H 72031 (16) 
Druckman: Dark upon the 

Harp ( 1961-2); de Gaetani, 

mezzo-soprano; New York 

Brass Quintet 

CRI 167 (22) 



10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

ALL WE ARE SAYING 
Distillation of Pacifica's cover- 
age of the November 15 Mori- 
torium/Mobilization Day acti- 
vities. Includes excerpts of the 
Rally, the March, the service 
at National Cathedral, and the 
gassing at the Justice Dept. 
(WBAI) 

1:00 

PANORAMA OF SWEDISH 
MUSIC 

Hilding Rosenberg: Symphony 
No. 6. (Radio Sweden) 

1:30 

WHATEVER BECAME OF.... 
SPRING BYINGTON? 
America's favorite mother-in- 
law proves much less dizzy 
than the roles she played in 
"You Can't Take It With You" 
and "The Devil and Miss Jones'! 
Richard Lamparski conducted 
the interview in the former 
star's Hollywood home. 
(WBAI) 



WEDNESDAY 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

with Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, David Bortin. 



2:00 

EXCERPTS FROM THE 
NATIONAL EMERGENCY 
CIVIL LIBERTIES COMMIT- 
TEE'S ANNUAL TOM PAINE 
AWARDS 

Professor Douglas Dowd of 
Cornell and Dave Dellinger. 
(WBAI) 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

3:30 

CONCERT OF NEW 

RELEASES 

5:30 

ECOLOGY & POLITICS 

Keith Murray 

5:45 

DRAMA & LITERATURE 

REVIEW 

Eleanor Sully 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
David N. Bortin 



6:30 
KPFA 



NEWS 



7:00 

ELWOOD'S ARCHIVES 

7:30 

ON WRITERS AND 

WRITING 

Marc Ratner 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

MUSIC OF KAROL 
SZYMANOWSKI 
We hear the Violin Concerto 
No. 1 (1917) and the Stabat 
Mater, Op. 53 (1929). Presen- 
ted by Wanda Tomczykowska 
of the Polish Arts and Culture 
Foundation. 

10:00 

AFTERMATH OF THE 
WAYNE GREENE CASE 
An interview with George 
French, the hold-out jurer 
who caused a hung jury in Mr. 
Greene's first trial and then 
became chairman of the Wayne 
Greene Defense Committee. 
The interviewer is Mike Trau- 
gott, KPFA volunteer. 



11:00 

THE GRAND CENTRAL 
STATION 

Eleanor Sully talks with the 
four members of an indepen- 
dent filmmakers' group based 
in Sausalito: Stephen Schmidt, 
Peter Adair, David Himmel- 
stein and Jack Newman. 



12:00 

♦INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

With DeLeon Harrison. 



WEDNESDAY 25 WEDNESDAY 



8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Bartok: Rhapsody, Op. 1 
Hambro, piano 
Bartok 313(23) 

Schubert: Symphony No. 5 
Toscanini, NBC Symphony 
♦Victrola VICS 1311 (22) 

Berg: Three Pieces for 
Orchestra,Op. 6 
Boulez, BBC Symphony 
♦Columbia MS 7179 (20) 

Boulez: Le Marteau sans 
Maitre. Craft, conductor 
♦Odyssey 3216 0154 (29) 



Berg: Altenberg Lieder, Op. 4 
Lukomska, soprano; Boulez 
BBC Symphony Orchestra 
♦Columbia MS 7179 (11) 
In honor of the birthday anni- 
versaries of Pierre Boulez, Bela 
Bartok, and Arturo Toscanini. 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:16 

MARCEL MARCEAU 

TALKING 

See March 1, 9:15 PM. 



WEDNESDAY 



12:00 

THE BUDAPEST 

CHILDREN'S CHOIR 

A concert recorded by Magyar 

Radio in early 1969. 

1:15 

PRIVATE CAPUTO 
Private Jorge Capu to, an A WOL 
anti-war GI, was given tempor- 
ary asylum in the Columbia 
University chapel, where he 
was interviewed by Mike Sahl 
and Steve Pepper of WBAI. 



24 



KIM A FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



WEDNESDAY 



2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Subotnick:WWd Bull 

electronic music 

Nonesuch H 71208 (28) 
Thomson : Mass for 2-Part 

Chorus and Percussion 

Thomson, King's Chapel 

Choir 

Cambridge CRS 412 (15) 
Mozart: Sonata No. 3 

Kraus, piano 

*Epic BC 1382 (14) 
Michael Haydn: Quintet in G 

Roth Quartet ensemble 

Society for Forgotten Music 

M 1005 (19) 



Brahms: Variations on an 
Original Theme, Op.21, No.l; 
Variations in f-sharp, Op. 9 
Webster, piano 
Dover HCR 5250 (32) 

5:30 

CAVEAT EMPTOR 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Gerald Feigen 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

An Evening With Liam 

O'Gallagher. 

San Francisco poet, painter, 

and happenings artist, Liam 



O'Gallagher visits with Charles 
Amirkhanian. O'Gallagher, who 
contributed the cover illustra- 
tion of this month's Folio, is 
the author of Planet Noise, a 
book of concrete poetry pub- 
lished by Nova Broadcast. We 
hear selected sound poems 
produced especially for this 
program. 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

BENNETT TARSHISH 

PRESENTS 

Chamber Music of Franz 

Schmidt. 

String Quartet No. 1 

Piano Quintet 
Jorg Demus, piano 
Vienna Konzerthaus Quartet 



10:30 

AMERICAN IN EXILE:ASIA 
DeeAnn Durst, an American 
who lives in Japan, talks about 
alternatives to the draft and 
about work with American 
soldiers in Japan. Miss Durst 
has been active with both Am- 
erican and Japanese organizers 
in Japan. The interview is in- 
troduced by KPFA's Carol 
Amyx. 

11:00 

McCLOSKEY'S GOT A 

BRAN NEW BAG 

Early hits by Johnny Cash 

and Carl Perkins from the 

Sun record label. 

12:00 

JURA-PARIS ROAD 
With Charles S lere. 




7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Gerald Feigen. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Milhaud: Suite Provencale 
Munch, Boston Symphony 
♦Victor LDS 2625 (17) 

Schutz: St. Matthew Passion 
Grischkat, Stuttgart ensemble 
Dover HCR 5242(59) 

Scriabin: Sonata No.3 (1897) 
Horowitz, piano 
Victor LM 2005 (20) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

OBSCENITY, PACIFICA 
AND THE FCC 
A recording of the Senate 
hearing on Senator John Pas- 
tore's bill to establish new 
procedures for the Federal 
Communications Commission 
to follow in granting renewals 
of broadcast licenses. Seven 
members of the FCC were 
witnesses at the Dec. 2 hearing 
before the Communications 
Sub-Committee of the Senate 
Commerce Committee, and 
some of them accused the 
Pacifica stations of broadcast- 
ing "obscenity and filth" over 
the airwaves. 



1:00 

CONCERT FROM MAGYAR 
RADIO 

"Music from our Century" 
Recorded in the Budapest Gov- 
ernment Radio Studio, Nov. 
13, 1968. 
Bartok: Duos for two pianos 

Szucs; Sebestyen 
Hindemith: Sonata for Clarinet 

and piano 

Kovacs, Szucs 
Debussy; Estampes 

Cornel Zempleny, piano 
Istvan Sarkozy: Variations 

for Cello (premiere); Mezo 
Hindemith: Two Choirs: 

Words: For A Butterfly 
Vaughn-Williams: Silencium 

and Music 
Ravel : Three Choirsongs 
Hosted by Warren Van Orden. 

2:30 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 



7:00 

VARIOUS FOLK 

With Larry Bartlett 

8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:15 

THEATRE NEW YORK 
The Anatomy of off-off- 
Broadway: The Director 
One in the time-to-time series 
which attempts to break of f-off 
Broadway into its component 
parts: in this instance, the 
director. The three directors 
are: Marshall Mason of the 
Circle Theatre; Philip Meister 
of the Cubiculo; and Brother 
Jonathan of the Everyman Co. 
They occasionally permit mo- 
derator Ann Rivers to say 
something. (WBAI) 



9:45 

THE EXPERIMENT IN 
INTERNATIONAL LIVING 
An interview with five people 
associated with Experiment in 
International Living, a foreign- 
student exchange group. Two 
of the five are part of a group 
of Costa Rican students and 
teachers currently living in 
Marin County. Denny Smith- 
son hosts. 

10:15 

ELECTRONIC MUSIC 

WITH JOHN PAYNE 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



3:30 

CONCERT OF 
RELEASES 



NEW 





5:30 

CHINESE PRESS REVIEW 

Jeanette Hermes 

5:45 

MUSIC REIVEW 

Charles Amirkhanian 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 

Hal and/ or Ann Draper 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



GREENWOOD LODGE 

In the Santa Cruz Mountains 

will be open for the 

EASTER WEEKEND 

MARCH 26-29 

FOR THAT SPRING FLING! 

Miles of wooded trails - Programs of folk dancing, singing 

concerts - Delicious cuisine - American Plan (three meals) 

Magnificent heated pool. 

For Brochure and rates, write: 

P.O.Box 828, Soquel, Calif. 95073, or call Greenwood 5-9995 

or 5-9552 (408) 



KPFA FOIIO MARCH 1970 



25 



FR I DA FRIDAY FRIDAY FR1DAIDAY 



27 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

ODE TO GRAVITY 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

program with Charles Amir- 

khanian. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Bartok : Wooden Prince 
(Ballet in one act, Op. 13) 
Ferencsik, Budapest 
Philharmonic Orchestra 
QualitonLPX 1164(39) 

Weill: Symphony No. 2 
Bertini, BBC Symphony 
* Angel S 36506 (26) 

Haydn: Sonata No. 46 .in Aflat 
Klien, piano 
*VoxSVBX 575(14) 

Haydn: Sonata No. 20 in c 
Klien, piano 
*VoxSVBX 575(17) 

Farberman: Impressions for 
Oboe and Percussion (1959) 
Gomberg, oboe; Farberman, 
Boston Chamber Ensemble 
♦Cambridge CRS 1805 (11) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:30 

PANORAMA OF SWEDISH 

MUSIC 

Karl-Birger Blomdahl: 

Symphony No. 3, "Facets" 

(Radio Sweden) 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Dick Meister. 

8:45 

REVIEW OF BRITISH 

WEEKLIES 

Rebroadcast from last night. 

9:00 

PLANET BALLUNAR 

The Great Mousing Shortage 

A story by Anne Hedley and 

other things. 

11:00 

CHILDREN'S BOOK 

SAMPLER 

With Ellyn Beaty 

26 



12:00 

THE VALUE OF PSYCHOTIC 

EXPERIENCE: SANITY, 

MADNESS, BLOWOUT 

CENTER, PART IV 

The fourth and final part of a 

program by Ronald D. Laing 

of the Esalen Institute on the 

establishment of a supportive 

environment for the psychotic. 

1:00 

OPEN HOUR 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

Open Hour. 

2:15 

BOOKS TO BUY, 
BORROW OR BURN 
Gene Thornton, former critic 
on The Critical People, reviews 
Art and Photography by Aaron 
Scharf. (Allen Lane, The Pen- 
guin Press) (WBAI) 

2:30 

WHATEVER BECAME OF.... 

ROBERT ARTHUR? 

The perennial juvenile in such 

films as 10 o'clock High and 

Cheaper by the Dozen talks 

about Jane Withers, Lon Mc 

Callister and Wanda Henrix to 

Richard Lamparski who visited 

him in Hollywood. (WBAI) 

3:00 

THE YOUNG LORDS 
Four leaders of the militant 
Puerto Rican youth organiza- 
tion, the Young Lords, talks 
with Bob Kuttner of WBAI. 



3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Stravinsky: Symphony in E-flat 

Op. 1; Stravinsky, Columbia 

Symphony Orchestra 

♦Columbia MS 6989 (35) 
Ruggles: Sun Treader 

Rozsnyai, Columbia 

Symphony Orchestra 

♦Columbia MS 6801 (18) 
Bartok-Serly: 5 Mikrokosmos 

Pieces; New Music String 

Quartet 

Bartok BRS 1(6) 
Brahms: Symphony No. 3 in F, 

Op. 90; Walter, Columbia 

Symphony Orchestra 

Columbia ML 5574 (34) 
Stravinsky: 3 Pieces for 

String Quartet 

New Music Quartet 

Bartok BRS 1 (6) 

5:30 

REVIEW OF BRITISH 

WEEKLIES 

5:45 

SCIENCE AND 
ENGINEERING REVIEW 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Dick Meister 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 
7:00 

CAL ARTS - DISNEY'S 
DOUGH TAKES FLIGHT 
Fourth in a series of programs 
on the new school of the arts 
soon to open in Southern Cal- 
ifornia. See highlight listing. 



8:00 

SOPHOCLES' ANTIGONE 
Translated by Dudley Fitts 
and Robert Fitzgerald, direc- 
ted by Howard Sackler, with 
Dorothy Tutin and Max Adrian. 
Caedmon Stereo TRS 320-S 

9:15 

STANFORD MORATORIUM 
CONFERENCE, JANUARY 
15, 1970. 

Speakers at the anti-war con- 
ference included James Sim- 
mons, Assistant to the Presi- 
dent of Stanford University; 
John Thorne, Bay Area attor- 
ney; Madeline Duckies of Wo- 
men's International League for 
Peace and Freedom, who re- 
cently returned from a visit to 
North Vietnam; David Hawk, 
one of the four originators of 
the national Moratorium or- 
ganization; and Albert Guerard, 
professor of English at Stan- 
ford. Rabbi Axel rod was chair- 
man of the conference. 

10:15 

THE HUNGRY ONLY 

DREAM OF BREAD 

A story by Albert Conery read 

by Penelope Weiss. 

11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 





c/©*d| ^ p&si* c/ S*rt| 



b&st* 



11:15 

MORNING CONCERT 
Stravinsky: he Sacre du 
Printemps; Boulez, 
Cleveland Orchestra 
♦Columbia MS 7293 (35) 

12:00 

REMINISCENCES OF A 
REBEL 
Ben Legere 

12:30 
BOOKS 
Kenneth Rexroth 

1:00 

ABORTION REFORM 
Cheriel Jensen of the Calif. 
Committee to legalize abortion 
talks about an initiative mea- 
sure to repeal existing abortion 
laws and replace them with a 
statement that a licensed phy- 
sician or surgeon is authorized 
to perform an abortion when- 
ever a pregnant woman re- 
quests one. The committee is 



circulating petitions to have 
the initiative placed on the 
ballot in Calif, in Nov., 1970. 
The interview is conducted by 
KPFA's Carol Amyx. 

1:15 

THE RECORDED ART OF 
FYODOR SHALYAPIN 
Fyodor Shalyapin Sings Arias 
from non Russian Operas. 
The second in a series tracing 
a complete selection of his 
commercially made recordings 
issued in the USSR by Melod- 
iya. According to Soviet record 
catalogues this series will not 
be released for export. Most 
of the recordings to be heard 
were compiled from the coll- 
ection of Moscow record coll- 
ector, Ivan Boyarsky. 



canyon cinematheque 
Thursdays at 8:00 PM 
San Francisco Art Institute 
800 Chestnut Street 
$1.00 



1:45 

TOWN MEETING ON 
NATIONAL WELFARE 
REFORM LEGISLATION 
Two addresses on the improve- 
ments and inadequacies of 
President Nixon's proposed 
welfare reform legislation, to 
be voted on by the 1970 Con- 
gress. John G. Veneman, Un- 
dersecretary of the Department 
of Health, Education and Wel- 
fare, presents the administra- 
tion's viewpoint, and Dr. Alan 
Wade, Dean of the School of 
Social Work at Sacramento 
State College, raises the ques- 
tions. 

3:30 

THIN AIR 

Recent developments in the 

ails and conversations with 

visiting artists. 



KPFA I 01 IO... MARCH 1«)70 



< 

D 

H 

< 
on 



4:30 

GOLDEN VOICES 

WITH ANTHONY BOUCHER 

Frieda Leider, soprano. 

5:00 

CHINA OBSERVED 
An interview with Neal Hun- 
ter, an Australian who was in 
China teaching English from 
1965-67. He was there for the 
first year of the Cultural Rev- 
olution, which is a main con- 
cern in the discussion. After 
leaving the country, Mr. Hun- 
ter wrote a book titled China 
Observed, and he has recently 
spent a year at UC Berkeley's 
Center for Chinese Studies wri- 
ting Shanghai Journal. 

6:00 

FRENCH NEWS 

Prepared and read in French 

by Pierre Idiart, editor of the 

weekly newspaper, Lc 

Californien. 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



7:00 

NORDIC MUSIC DAYS, 

STOCKHOLM 1968 

Arne Nordheim: Eco, for 
soprano, children's choir, 
mixed choir and orchestra 
(1967-8) on texts of 
Quasimodo. Blomstedt, 
Swedish Radio Choir and 
Orchestra 

Joonas Kokkonen .Sinfonia 
111(1967) Comissiona, 
Stockholm Philharmonic 

Rued Langgaard: Music of 
the Spheres, for soli, chorus 
and orchestra (1918). 
Comissiona, Stockholm 
Philharmonic Orchestra 

Bo Nilsson: stunde eines 
blocks, for soprano and 
chamber ensemble 
(1959) on a text by Oy- 
vind Fahlstrom. Staern, 
Swedish Radio Orchestra 

Jon Nordal: Adagio for 
flute, harp, piano, and 
strings (1965). Blomstedt, 
Swedish Radio Orchestra 

Introduced by Bennett 

Tarshish. 



8:30 

RADIO EVENT NO. 8, 
"BAGS" 

The topic is bags — all sizes 
and types. A selective docu- 
mentary compiled by A. J. 
Gnazzo, E.J. and P.J. Veres. 
This KPFA benefit concert will 
be broadcast live from the 
Berkeley Art Center, Live Oak 
Park, in Berkeley. Please see 
announcement on inside back 
cover of this Folio for com- 
plete details. 

9:30 

THE POETRY OF MARK 

STRAND 

Mr. Strand, author of Reasons 

for Moving reads from that 

book, as well as several from 

a book to be published next 

year. The poems are beautiful 

and fine, and everything good 

that poems can be. 



10:00 

SOCIALIZATION: THE 

PINK BLANKET 

ROUTINE 

Brenda Brush, a member of 



the National Organization of 
Women and of Women's Lib- 
eration, speaking at a teach-in 
on the oppression of women 
at San Francisco State College 
on December 10, 1969. This 
is the first in a series of seven 
talks taken from the teach-in. 

10:15 

TROUBLE AT THE 
GERMAN UNIVERSITIES 
Colin Edwards interviews Pro- 
fessor Alexander von Hase, the 
noted German historian, au- 
thor and lecturer, on student 
unrest at the German univer- 
sities. He also explains the dif- 
ferences between the German 
educational system and those 
of other Western countries, 
and the ways in which these 
differences affect the whole 
question of dissent at German 
universities. 



11:00 

THE ROLAND YOUNG SHOW 



ITS SUNDAY AGAIN 

29 

EASTER TOO! 



IT'S SUNDAY AGAIN IT'S SUNDAY AGAIN IT'S SUNDAY AGAIN IT'S SUNDAY AGAI 



8:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast 

news. 



of last night's 



8:30 

MORNING CONCERT: 
IN MEMORIAM EASTER 
EGG 

Fred Schmitt presents a spe- 
cial program of Easter music. 
We hear Bach's Cantata No. 4 
"Christ Lag in Todesbanden, " 
and Easter Oratorio, as well as 
two works of Olivier Messiaen, 
Et Exspecto Resurrectionem 
Mortuorum and Couleurs de 
la Cite Celeste. 

11:00 

*JAZZ, BLUES AND 

PHIL EL WOOD 



1:00 

NORDIC MUSIC DAYS, 

STOCKHOLM 1968 

Paul Rovsing Olsen: Patet per 
nove musici, Op. 55 (1966) 
Naumann, Musica Nova 
Group 

Thorkell Sigurbjornsson: 
String Quartet (1968) 
Saulesco Quartet 

Arne Mellnas: Intensity 6,5 
for tape (1966) 

Bjorn Fongaard: Homo 
Sapiens for tape (1966) 

Kari Rydman: Symphony of 
the Modern Worlds (1968) 
Blomstedt, Swedish Radio 
Orchestra 

Bernhard Lewkovitch: // 
cantico delle creature (1963) 
Stenlund, S. Francesco 
d'Assisi Vocal Group 

Moses Pergament: Four poems 
for soprano and orchestra 
(1966). Comissiona, Stock- 
holm Philharmonic Orch. 



2:30 

THE LONG RUSSIAN 
WINTER PART 1 
"Unto Myself I Reared a Mon- 
ument". This program is a bio- 
graphy of the great Russian 
poet, Aleksandr Pushkin, 
(1799-1837) illustrated by his 
writings as used in songs and 
operatic arias by Russian com- 
posers. The program was writ- 
ten and produced by Kathy 
Dobkin of WBAI. It will be 
followed by more romances 
and arias to Pushkin texts 
presented by Larry Jackson. 

5:30 

VIEWS AND REVIEWS 

Eleanor Sully 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:00 

COMMENTARY 
Steve Murdock 



7:30 

THE VALUE OF 

PSYCHOTIC 

EXPERIENCE 

SCIENCE OF MADNESS 

Stanlislav Grof, Alan Watts 

and Julian Silverman in a 

public presentation recorded 

at Longshoremen's Hall in 

San Francisco. 



10:00 

*STAYS FRESH LONGER 
Tonight's program includes a 
tape made by KPFA of Santana 
which was recorded Feb. 6 
during a Black Panther benefit 
at the Berkeley Community 
Theater, using the dolby sys- 
tem. 




Imported coffees 
Roasted in our own store 
Special Blended Teas 
Herbs and Spices 
Whole and Ground 
Mail Orders 
Promptly Filled. 
1 block above Shattuck 
2124 Vine Street 
Berkeley, Calif. 
Tel. 841-0564 




KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



27 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of last night's 

news. 

7:30 

STRANGE LANDS AND 

FRIENDLY PEOPLE 

THE AMERICAN INDIANS 

A mixture of recorded music, 

live tapes, and interviews with 

Indians on and off Alcatraz. 

Tapes and interviews by Judith 

Cook. 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Steve Murdock. 

8:45 

MORNING CONCERT 

Gerhard: Symphony No. 3, 

"Collages, " for tape and 

orchestra. Prausnitz, BBC 

Symphony Orchestra 

*Angel S 36558 (20) 
Prokofiev: Sonata No. 6 in A 

Slobodyanik, piano 

♦Angel SR 40109 (27) 
Beethoven : Piano Concerto 

No. 5. Casadesus, piano; 

Rosbaud, Concertgebouw 

Orchestra 

♦Odyssey 3216 0326(37) 
Schubert: Symphony No. 5 

Skrowaczewski, Minnea- 
polis Symphony 

♦Mercury SRW 18083 (24) 
We begin this morning's con- 
cert with a tribute to Roberto 
Gerhard who died in January 
of this year. 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

WHERE HAVE ALL THE 
LIBERALS GONE? 
A search for the liberals in the 
current scene of political ac- 
tion leads Harry S. Ashmore, 
President of the Center for 
the Study of Democratic In- 
stitutions, to find that liber- 
als have been in the rear- 
guard of politics indulging in 
reason rather than confron- 
tation; functioning as critics; 
maintaining a code of conduct 
and a balance between indivi- 
dual liberty and social justice. 
Participating in the discussion 
are Donald McDonald, Stanley 
Sheinbaum, John Cogley, Har- 
vey Wheeler and Judy Saltz- 
man. 

1 1:45 

THE NEW SOCIAL WORKERS 
Members of the School of 
Social Service Administration 
at the University of Chicago 
discuss the new team-work 
being developed by social 
workers to cut red tape rather 
than create it. Participants are 
Joshua Cohen, assistant pro- 
fessor, Mclvm Goldberg, attor- 

28 



MONDAY 



ney and research associate, 
and Janet Bruin, a graduate 
student. Moderator is Ken 
Pierce, lecturer in humani- 
ties at the University of Chi- 
cago. 
(Conversations at Chicago.) 

12:15 

THE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 
OF RADIO-TV BELGIUM 
Performing in the broadcast 
Auditorium/Studio in Brus- 
sels, January 10, 1969. The 
conductor is John Hiersoux 
and Rene Costy is the violin 
soloist. 
Haydn: Symphony No. 99 in 

E-flat. 
Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 3 

inG, K.216 
Norman Dello Joio: New York 

Profiles 

1:30 

SYMPOSIUM ON 
TRADITIONAL AFRICAN 
ART 

This is the sixth session of 
the symposium held at the 
Hampton Institute. Jacqueline 
Delange, of the Musee de 
l'Homme, will speak on "The 
Representation of political, 
religious, and technical quali- 
ties in African statues;" Paul 
Wingert, of Columbia Univer- 
sity, speaks on "Style in Afri- 
can Sculpture" and Stanley 
Shaloff, Wisconsin State Uni- 



versity (Oshkosh), gives a talk 
on "W.H. Sheppard: Congo 
Pioneer." (WBAI) 

3:30 

AFTERNOON CONCERT 

Tchaikovsky: Symphony 

No. 6., "Pathetiquc" 

Mitropoulos, N.Y. Phil. 

♦Odyssey 32160216 (40) 
Haydn: Symphony No. 13 

in D 

Goberman, Vienna State 

Opera Orchestra 

♦Odyssey 32160116 (18) 
Haydn: Symphony No. 14 

in A 

Goberman, Vienna State 

Opera Orchestra 

♦Odyssey 32160116 (13) 
Vaughan Williams: 

Symphony No. 9 

Boult, London Philhar- 
monic Orchestra 

Everest LPBR 6006 (34) 

5:30 

CONFRONTATION 

WASHINGTON 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Lewis F. Sherman 



6:30 

KPFA NEWS 



7:00 

SOVIET PRESS & 

PERIODICALS 

7:30 

OPEN HOUR 

8:30 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER 

MUSIC SOCIETY 

8:30 

SAN FRANCISCO 
CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY 
The Woodwind Quintet of the 
Amici Delia Musica; Janet Bak- 
er, flute; John Moses, clarinet; 
David Seeley, basoon; Max 
Mazenko, French horn. Com- 
positions by Mozart, Haydn, 
Hindemith and Poulenc. Re- 
corded live from Fireman's 
Fund Theater in San Francisco. 

10:30 

♦WORDS 

A program of new poetry and 

word art produced by Clark 

Coolidge. 

11:30 

EXPERIMENTS IN ART 
AND TECHNOLOGY 
With Richard Friedman 

12:00 ' 

♦INFORMATION 

TRANSMISSION 

MODULATION AND 

NOISE 

With Richard Friedman 



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providing families with a choice 
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KIM \ FOLIO... MARCH 1970 



TUESDAY 



7:00 

KPFA NEWS 

Rebroadcast of 

news. 




-rc^v 



last night's 



7:30 

IN THE MORNING 

With Jack Harms 

8:30 

COMMENTARY 
Rebroadcast of last night's 
commentator, Lewis Sherman. 

8:45 

SOVIET PRESS AND 

PERIODICALS 

A rebroadcast with William 

Mandel. 



9:15 

MORNING CONCERT 

Purcell: King Arthur 
Collegium Aureum 
*Victrola VICS 1432 (23) 

Mendelssohn: Symphony No. 
2 in B-flat, Op. 52 
Sawallisch, New Philharmonia 
Chorus and Orchestra 
♦Philips PHS 2 904 (66) 

10:45 

MORNING READING 

11:15 

THE NEW WOMAN 

See March 17, at 10:15 PM. 

1:00 

PANORAMA OF SWEDISH 

MUSIC 

Karl-Birger Blomdahl - Musical 

Progress to the opera Aniara. 

(Radio Sweden) 



1:30 

GERMAN FILM 

See March 13, at 5:00 PM. 



2:30 

OPEN HOUR 
Rebroadcast of 
Open Hour. 

3:30 

CONCERT OF 
RELEASES 



last night's 



NEW 



5:30 

GERMAN PRESS REVIEW 

Harold Reynolds 

5:45 

DRAMA & LITERATURE 

REVIEW 

Eleanor Sully 

6:00 

COMMENTARY 
Peter Shapiro 

6:30 

KPFA NEWS 

7:30 

KEITH BARNES READING 

HIS POEMS 

Keith Barnes reads from his 

own work. Recorded in Paris, 

in September, 1967. Three of 

Mr. Barnes' unpublished poems 

appear in this month's Folio. 

KPFA Archives. 



8:00 

OPEN HOUR 

9:00 

THE TRADITION OF 
BLACK CLASSICAL MUSIC 
IN AMERICA 

Natalie Hinderas, concert pia- 
nist and assistant professor of 
music at Temple University, 
discusses barriers and achieve- 
ments of black classical com- 
posers and performers today. 
From the Midway series from 
the University of Chicago. 



THE 3 1ST OF MARCH 



10:00 

THE SOPHISTS, 
THUCYDIDES, 
AND EURIPIDES 
An analysis by Hugh Lloyd- 
Jones, Regis professor of Greek 
at Oxford University, which 
sheds new light on the deus ex 
machina which ends many A- 
thenian plays. One of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago's From the 
Midway series. 

11:00 

OUTSIDE 

A listener composed opera 

based on the concept by Ste- 

fanovitsch Postalnik. Realized 

late at night in March of 

1969, with the performers 

drawn from the audience of 

WBAI. 

12:00 

*INSIDE ON THE OUTSIDE 

With De Leon Harrison. 





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Belly-Gods Clam Chowder 

with bread hunks for sopping 

and celery sticks for crunching 

Belly-Gods Cheese Souffle 

Green Vegetable Belly-Gods 

in appropriate sauce Potato Frits 

Beet and Cucumber Salad 

Apples Almondine 

with whipped cream 

Belly-Gods special coffee (ground as made) 

also tea and milk 

Request our Menu today, and try BeJIy - Gods 

I've had requests that I, Lois McCarty, Chef of Belly-Gods, 
give a weekly cooking class. I am happy to announce that 
this is now possible on Monday or Tuesday evenings from 
7 to 9:30 PM in Belly-Gods kitchen in Crockett. S3.00 per 
session, plus materials. Class limited to 12 people, age 14 
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possibility of beginning March 9 or 10. 

P.O. Box 47, Crockett, 94525 
845-4717 Berkeley or 787- 1409 Crockett 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



c, 



so 



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INSTRUMENTS 



HARPSICHORD to rent or buy, one manual 
451-7985. 



PROPERTIES 



CARMEL SUBLET, spacious and furnished, 
July and August, $200/month, 2 bedroom 
house, References, (408) 624-1 632,evenings. 

HOMES & INVESTMENTS KFPA spoken here. To buy 
or sell (a home, lot or income property), tune in with 
us. Tepping Realty Co., Berkeley, TH 3-5353; El 
Cerrito, LA 6-5353 (426-0) 

READY TO SELL? Why not list with an active inter- 
racial office that believes in integrated neighbor- 
hoods. Call and let's talk. Central Realty Service. 
Arlene Slaughter, Realtor. OL 8-2177. TH 9-2976 
evenings (673-0) 

ATTRACTIVE ROOMS in historic Mendocino home, $25 
per week. Box 37, Mendocino 95460; (707) 937-5219 
(1928-0) 



SERVICES 



««»>»«>«»»» 



CARPENTER — First class work, reasonable. Remodel- 
ing, additions and repairs. Kitchens, bathrooms, 
family rooms, garages, carports, decks, patios. San 
Anselmo, 453-1821 (536-0) 



C. J. HUGHES CO. Remodeling specialists. Thought- 
ful planning, expert workmanslvp, room additions. 
Kitchens, bathrooms, decks. 848-7323 (2451-0) 

HOUSEPAINTING inside and out LA 6-1805 (641-0) 

WORKING CONTRACTOR reasonable, reliable. Small 
repairs or kitchens, bathrooms, room additions. Li- 
tensed. John Hausman, 841-5573 (24290) 

LAND INVESTORS RESEARCH Tax problems? Let us 
show you how to invest your tax dollars at a profit, 
and avoid paying them all to Uncle Sam. Write for 
free information, 645 Tamalpais Dr., Corte Madera, 
Ca. (6370) 

ELI ROOFING CO. Shingling contractor spe- 
cializing in unusual roofs: wood shingles and 
shakes, thatch roofs, fandom shingling. Free 
estimate. 849-4395. 

BROCHURES, CATALOGS, PROGRAMS, 
LETTERHEADS, FORMS - Sandy s Coldtype 
Composition, Walnut (reek, Phone 939-2025. 

EUROPEAN CAR of your choice cheap! Will 
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careful use in Europe, July. 92 1-78 j 3. 

01 ALII IED TAX CONSULTANT- Reason 

able rates. Mr. Cohen, Box 9 171, Berkeley, 
94709. 

I \SI BAY ( OMMUTERS Ride a chartered 
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available (688-0) 

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ers interested in playing with small amateur 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS 



BRAILLE editions of the KPFA Folio are available to 
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J. KRISHNAMURTI For information on his speaking 
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Ca. 93023. Telephone (805) 646-2726. 

WRITERS AT ASPEN, Summer Writing 
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and Mystery Poet to be announced. Limiled 
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S.F.Art Institute-, 800 Chestnut, S.I .,94 I 33, 
or call 237-6850. 

SONGS THAT PLEASE- Folksingei Barbara 
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ist in songs for gatherings of children also 
parties and concerts. Reasonable rales (ill 
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PICTURE FRAMES The Artisans. Custom framing. 
1964 Union St., S. F. WA 1-0456 (2304-0) 

EVERYTHING for the home wine- and beverage- 
maker: Barrels, yeast, concentrates, malts, supplies. 
Wines and champagnes. Oak Barrel Winecraft, 1201 
University Ave, Berkeley. 849-0400 (1982-2) 

HANDCRAFT FROM EUROPE, Sausalito 
Store No. 1 at Village Fair 
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at 1210 Bridgeway 
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30 



KPFA MM IO... MARCH 1970 




Photo by Bob Flexer 



Keith Barnes: a Brief Life 

1934 - born, near London, England 

1947 - won scholarship in composition to 
Royal Academy of Music 

1947-59 - several of his works performed by 
leading groups, particularly chamber music groups, 
in London 

1960 - began writing poetry, slopped writing 
music 

1960-69 - worked in music publishing, worked 
as film editor for BBC, lived in New York state 
1964, in Berkeley 1966, published his first 
volume of poems, Born to Flying Glass (Harcourt 
Brace & World), lived mainly in Paris, where he 
was working on his second book of poems when 
he fell ill of leukemia and died September 10 
1969. 

The poems published here are relatively recent 
work, made available to the folio by Miss 
Jacqueline Starer. 

A previous KPFA program of Keith Barnes 
poetry read by the poet,. -may be heard on 
March 18 at 11:30 AM, and again on March 31 
at 7:15 PM. 



Will Not Forget 



Windfalls of birds and swirls of leaves 
I walk pause stop You drive a high sky through me 
drop my case throw my coat and grasp you eyes closed 
all spellbinding spring throughout the shimmering summer 
stand with you and root into the paving stones 

Winter gave me old shoes I broke their laces 

I shuffled through the days forgot I could stand straight 

forgot how love is jack and jill down the hill 

corridors of diamonds tumbling bees a-buzz 

and dreams which smile silence with such suave lips 

How could I have borne myself so hibernated 

- pitted and slung so low into my body? 

How could I have lived without this marrow in my bone? 

- so bent so drear so hollow nestling grudges 
which you have so simply soothed from me and cast 
off like so much jetsam to the. sea 

As I walk I carry you the warmth of two 

and I will not forget will not forget 

your legs and arms locked round me your head tucked tight 

your breath against my heart inside my clothes 

inside my clothes - I won't forget 

I do not cannot live without 

this hanging fire 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



The Waters Will Sway 

The waters will sway my words my eyes will blur 

my lines go tilting on the surface as I sink 

down where the nuns with gracious arms of healing 

catch me to their patchwork quilt of sunning churchyards 

where skies play with grassblades pimpernels and flies 

I will join the dead lamb blossoming in the appletree 

old men with canes fantastic gnarled like fists 

who sit by camembert-encrusted walls 

where nothing vulgar rashes no new villas 

Die I will as you so often many wanted 

I'll laugh you goodbye "See you in hell!" I'll cry 

I'll haunt you through pinched pouty porcelain lips 

taunt you from within the tomb's plastic flora 

while worms gorge and tumble from my wordshorn neck 

I will beg you not to squirm I'm being cleaned 

It's normal I'll send postcards - "Wish you were here" 

At last I'll put myself in step with your dance 
and you'll be rid of me I'll call no tune 
for you who never think to pay the piper 

I feel the worms arch on my skin already 

welcome society at last I accept you 

Old friend you're like a flea brushed off - you reland 

Come I smile for you won't scratch Come give me 

the deaths these noveau-poor praise up as life 

who always tried to force me to be Something 

when Nothing was all I truly longed to be 

My death will mirror to perfection your Way of Life: 
waters will sway my words my eyes will blur 



Black Sail 



I thought it love which would unlatch the light 
I thought I'd never hoist black sail for you 
come high tide back the full wind white above me 
but am held to port Anchored on the other side 

See my black sails - for I am dead to you 
and nevermore shall coast your way again 
nevermore shall gaze into your amber 
hair your amber eyes bewitched by moons 

See my black sails - the hawthorn shall still blossom 
close along its branch white fleece for winter's ribs 
and it will softly brush against your cheek 
but press not It hides my nevermore 

See my black sails - you must alone along the cliff 

alone along your bed asking to be told 

if the wind the rain 

and are the seagulls soaring'.' 



32 



KPI-A FOLIO...MARCII l l >70 



THE ADVENTURES OF RALPH AND JEANETTE 



or 



One Word Leads to Another 



A Serial by Unknown Author 
Part Two 

"You speak beautifully," Jeanette Downs said 



to him. 



"Oh yes," said Ralph, laughing. 

"Why are you laughing?" she said. 

"I don't know," Ralph said. 

"Laugh again," she said. He did. 

People craned around to stare at him. They were 
in a coffeeshop at that university in southern California. 

"Do you laugh a lot?" Jeanette said. 

Ralph paused. She had blue eyes. "I don't 
know," he said. 

She laughed. "You're odd," she said. 

"Odd?" he said. 

"Well . . . different." 

"How flattering," Ralph said. 

She looked puzzled. "Oh," she said, "you mean 
everyone says that?" 

"Yes," Ralph said, "to everyone else." 

"No," Jeanette said. 

"Yes," Ralph said, "if they happen to notice." 

"I hardly ever say it." 

"I didn't mean aloud," Ralph said. 

She bridled. There's no other word. "It simply 
means that they find the other person interesting," she 
said. 

"Or strange, or fascinating," he said. 

"Or repulsive," she said. 

"Oh yes, yes indeed," Ralph laughed. " 'Dif- 
ferent' is such different things. If there are different 
things." 

What the devil, she thought. He won't take a 
compliment. He won't take offense. What is this? 

"Just the same," she said, "it's generally com- 
plimentary around here." 

"It shouldn't be," Ralph said. 

"Damn it, it is!" she yelled. 

"I see," said Ralph. 

"You don't!" she said. "No, Mr. Englishman, 
you don't!" 

Ralph looked startled enough. 
"What you don't understand," she. said, "is how 
much of a compliment it really is around here. It is, 
in fact . . . the ultimate compliment of a conformist 
society!" 

"Oh, wizard!" said Ralph. He had already started 
to applaud when a sudden storm broke out on his face. 
It was a curious effect. "You read that!" he said. 

"Of course," Jeanette said. "I'm a sociology 
major. It's my business to read such things." 

That was his chance to run. As luck would 
have it he didn't, though he could never recall why not. 
There was, of course, no second chance. Contrary to 
popular supposition, nature is fair, but not at all prodigal. 
Thus: 



The following day. Same place. Same table. 

Jeanette: "Your accent is so strange." 

Ralph: "Strange?" 

Jeanette: "Well. ..I don't mean because it's English. ..but 

because it's hardly English." 
Ralph: "I see." 
Jeanette: "It's so. ..faintly English. It's really more American 

than English... no... it's both, side by side. That's 

what's odd." 
Ralph: "I daresay." 
Jeanette: "You're trying to make the English stronger. It isn't. 

It's weaker. Faint. Weak." 
Ralph: "No." 
Jeanette: "But it is." 
Ralph: "It only appears weak. As a steel filament might in 

the sun." 
Jeanette: "I thought it was maybe just the last traces. You know, 

on its way out." 
Ralph: "I hope not." 
Jeanette: "You don't want to disappear into America without 

a sound, is that it?" 
Ralph: "That's very good. That's really very good 

"That's very good. That's really very good." 
[ACTOR'S NOTE: When Ralph speaks this line, 
he doesn't know that he isn't lying.] 



Ralph was very popular with his colleagues, but they 
didn't like him. It was the Head of the Department who liked 
him. Mac. Dr. Mackenstein. Cropped red hair, round florid face, 
olive bow tie, pink shirt, tan gabardine. Affable. Dumb. Ralph 
enjoyed saying to himself, "The Head of the Speech Department 
is dumb." In fact he said it once too often. But meanwhile he 
liked Mac. Mac liked him. They weren't the apple of each other's 
eye, they were plums. Thus Ralph was often invited to dinner at 
Mac's Tudor-style home in the hills. Usually he went, knowing 
full well he'd be bored. Bored by all but the flattery, that is. 
"Flattery is never boring," he thought, "only the people it 
comes from." It wasn't much of a thought. Mac's wife was 
responsible for it. That is to say, Mac's flattery was restrained. 
He had a position to maintain. His wife's was not. So did she. 

Her name was Ginny. She was sweet, milk-skinned, 
well loved, deformed. One leg was six inches shorter than the 
other. She wore flappy clothes and walked like a boat pitching 
in a storm. The house was filled with sweetness, cats, and her 
mother, who helped things a bit by hating cats. "They're 
sneaky," she kept saying. "It's their quiet," Ralph said. "No it 
ain't," she said. 

Mac was kept busy during drinks and dinner, but there 
was always a chat afterwards, preferably about literature. Mac's 
favorite author was George Bernardl Shaw. Naturally. "Now 
there's a man who understood our line of work," he said. "How 
can I like this man?" Ralph thought. "The Irish are all that's 
left who understand that we are as we speak," said Mac. 
"What?" said Ralph. "No, as," said Mac. "Correct?" 
"Oh yes, yes indeed," Ralph said, worrying about James Joyce 
and the African dogs. "You look worried," Mac said. "Any of 
my business?" "The interior monologue," Ralph said. "Oh, yes, 
they're safe from us there, aren't they?" "What a good thing 
to say!" Ralph said. "Eh?" said Mac. 

They really got along quite well. Or did, until Ralph 
refused not only to play Henry Higgins but to have anything to 
do at all with the Department's spring production of Pygmalion. 

"But why, Ralph," Mac said, "why such a. ...such a rabid 
refusal?" 

"It makes me vomit," Ralph said. 

"That's rabid enough," said Dr. Mackenstein, 
flushing mightily. 



KPFA FOLIO.. MARCH 1970 



33 



I think he's going to vomit, Ralph thought. But he didn't. 
It was Jeanette who did. Or at least said she did. 

"You make me vomit," she said. 

"Is that a compliment around here?" Ralph said. 

She bounced up from the coffeeshop table. "Goodness, 
what breasts!" Ralph thought. 

"You're acting like a baby!" she said. 

Ralph laughed and laughed. 

It was a week before she spoke again. A year before 
she told that she used to think of him as a Henry Higgins. An 
eternity before she forgave his not being one. 

Even so, in this Ralph remained one up. Because he 
didn't tell her that the play in fact did make him vomit. Not 
copiously, but enough. 

"Have to be careful what I say about that damned play 
in this country," he said to himself. 

He did not care to count the number of times he had 
said nothing at all about it, while his mother read it to him 
again and again, year after year. That doesn't matter, he thought. 
Not even the cheapness of the dream matters. That incredible 
Victorian dream. What was it someone wrote: "Had the Greeks 
believed in the glory of the bourgeois, they would have written 
the story in Shaw's way; but it was the loveliness of prayer they 
celebrated, and so they wrote it in their own." Perhaps. Perhaps. 
But Shaw had been clever enough to isolate an essence - 
incantation. Had Doris? 

'Henry Higgins, my ass!" cried Ralph Paukweiler. 
"I'd do better to play Eliza!" And so he would have. Even as 
you and I. 



Ralph was living in the basement of a retired couple's 
house. Retired from living in North Dakota. It was a stucco 
house with a dry palm tree in front of it. The couple thought 
that Ralph was very refined, and were proud to have him in 
their basement. From time to time they sent down homemade 
jellies until, as the result of a discussion with some friends, they 
switched to marmelade. There were no children, and for some 
peculiar reason no TV, so the house was quiet and the 
basement quieter. Hot and quiet. And dark. "I always feel like 
I'm asleep here," someone said. 

Ralph was sitting in the room crying when there was 
a knock at the door. The back door. His "private entrance." 
It was Jeanette. 

"How did you get here?" he said. 

"Registrar's office," she said. "Foo, what a place. 
Why don't you turn on some light?" 

"My eyes hurt," Ralph said. And they did. 

"I came to say I'm sorry I blew up at you." 

"Sit down," Ralph said. "Take the chair." What an 
expression, he thought. 

"Which one," she said. 

"Both of them," Ralph said. 

"What?" 

"The soft one," he said, "there." 

"I'm sure you have your reasons." 

"For what," Ralph said. 

"For childishly antagonizing Dr. Mackenstein, your 
friend, protector, and father figure," she said. 

"Mother figure," he said. 

"No," she said. 

He sighed. "If either one be true, then my behaving 
childishly is of the essence." 

"Exact!/ 1 " Jeanette said. "That's exactly how I 
figure it. It was natural. And do you know what else is natural?' 

"No, I don't," Ralph said. 

"That he wants you back," she said. 

"No," said Ralph. 

"Yes," She said. "Star light, star bright, star of the 
whole Department. I've heard it said they navigate by you." 

"Not him," Ralph said. "Not him. He followeth the 
comets " 

M 



"Who, for instance," she said. 

"The milky wife," said Ralph. 

"That's not enough," she said. 

"It's all he needs of evil," Ralph said. 

Jeanette sank back into the chair. "You're awful," 
she said. 

What a good word that used to be, Ralph thought. 
Awful. How it did mean something once. Druid ruins. In the 
moonlight, ice-forests, not penny volcanoes, splashy stuff, 
"all the merely terrible".... 

"No I'm not," Ralph said. Jeanette didn't answer. 

Silence, he thought. That's what she means. That 
she's going to be awful. She's gone off to join the unfeatured 
gods. Pretty soon I'll hear the trumpet, the voice of the last 
silence. Take my measure, Mr. Peter. I wonder how he does it. 
"Stand over here, son, in the light...." Is it Ignorance he 
measures? Like an Intelligence Test? Or is that Satan's job? 
With a lot of secretaries, ladies in flappy flowered clothes 
gabbing, gabbing sweetly, their eyes clamped together some- 
where behind your head? "But I tell you, dearie, ignorance 
ain't bliss. Why do you think poor God had to open a whole 
new department?"... Right. Did he who made the Lamb make 

thee? I'm hungry, that's 

thee? I feel rotten. ...Why do I have such a bellyache? 

I'm hungry, that's it. ..That's it, I'm hungry... 

"You look sad," Jeanette said. 

As a matter of fact he did, and had right along, but 
she had just noticed it. "I was in such a blind rage," she told 
her girlfriend Lou. "I can imagine," Lou said. But the truth 
was that her eyes had simply needed time to adjust to the dark. 
Thought it's true there was some rage. She had involved herself 
in forgiveness. She was cutting a class, her room needed cleaning. 
"What the shit am I doing here?" she thought. And in fact had 
made ready to go, was leaning forward in the chair to rise up, 
when she noticed that Ralph looked sad. So awfully sad. Her 
brain reeled.. ..Me?... .Dr. Mackenstein?::::Life?.... He's staring 
at my breasts! Oh hell, I was so mean to him.... He looks so 
sad.... It's breaking my heart, what shall I do? 

She fell in love with him, got up, and seduced him. 



Ralph caught cold. Jeanette scoffed at his idea of going 
to the infirmary to get something for it. "It can be our first 
community property," she said. Ralph laughed, and went 
anyway. 

"But you just have a cold," the doctor said. 

"Just?" said Ralph. 

"A common cold." 

"I like that phrase," Ralph said. 

The doctor nodded. "It's useful," he said. 

"It's accurate," Ralph said. 

"Is it?" the doctor said. "Well then, that's what you 
have." 

"I can't stand the sound it makes," Ralph said. 

"What?" 

"I can't hear my voice. I sound like somebody else. 
Somebody else, with a cold." 

"Well, tough!" the doctor said. He was saving up for 
an airplane, and little things upset him. 

Ralph winced. "I also have a bellyache," he said. 

"Well why didn't you say so," the doctor said. 
"Constant?" 

"Yes," Ralph said, "except when I'm. ..screwing." 

"You mean having intercourse?" the doctor said. 

"Yes," Ralph said. 

"That's natural," the doctor said. 

"I know it's natural," Ralph said. 

"I mean that it relieves your stomache ache," the 
doctor said. 

"Why should it?" 

The doctor grinned. "Intercourse is good for what 
ails you." 

KIM A FOL10...MARCH W70 



"Unless what ails you is intercourse," Ralph said. 

The doctor's face changed. He leaned forward, looking 
all ears and sympathy like a pastor. "Look here," he said, "are 
you trying to tell me you have VD? Is that what you're trying 
to say?" 

"No," Ralph said. 

"Potency trouble?" 

Ralph looked startled. 

"Can't get it up?" the doctor said. 

Ralph shook his head. 

"Or keep it up?" the doctor said. 

Ralph grimaced. 

The doctor sat back. "Then what the hell as your 
trouble with intercourse?" 

"I have none," Ralph said, "except that it gets in the 
way of my work and I can't stand the sound it makes." 

"What?"sa\d the doctor. 

"All that grunting and squishing," Ralph said. 

The doctor winced. "Who the hell asked you to say 
that," he said. "Who asked you to listen? V.'hy don't you mind 
your own goddamned business?" 

"But that is my business." 

"What is?" 

"To listen." 

"No it isn't, " the doctor said. "Your business is to 
screw your head off...." 

"So that's what it means," Ralph said. 

"....not to lie around listening, like some.. ..like some 
goddamned voyeur...." 

"Ecouteur," Ralph said. 

"Oh shut up," the doctor said. He opened the bottom 
drawer of his desk and began pushing around among bottles and 
vials, finally coming up with some white-and -yellow capsules. 
"Take these for your stomach," he said. "Aspirin for your cold. 
Stop drinking so much coffee. Get some ear plugs. If nothing 
works come on back and we'll shoot a barium enema into you 
and have a look. Goodbye." 

"Goodbye," Ralph said. 

"And my condolences to your girlfriend," the 
doctor said. 

"My fiancee," Ralph said. 

"You're not going to marry her?" the doctor said. 

"Why not," Ralph said, "would someone else make 
a different noise?" 

"Jesus H. Christ!" said the doctor. 



Ralph was not one to underestimate the potentials of 
event, but somehow he couldn't bring himself to concentrate. 
His thoughts kept sliding around in purely impulsive combinations, 
which meant, he knew, that he was feelina the situation rather 
than thinking about it. 

He felt, for instance, that there were suddenly holes in 
his shelter (which probably accounts for my cold, he thought). 
He felt also that it was no small thing to find that in the space of 
a week the lightning of metamorphosis had struck twice in the 
same place, changing two friends into one enemy and one 
fiancee. And quite possibly altering the course of his career. 
Would Mac get in the way of his M.A.? of his teaching fellowship? 
Would Jeanette upset his work? his budget? Would the bellyache 
send him back to that music-hall comic of a doctor, and why 
did he almost hope so? How can I like that man, he thought. 
And what accounts for his notion of me as a coffee-drinker? 
My cold must be worse than I thought. As a matter of fact I think 
I shall try some coffee. Which he did, and found that it made 
him both dizzy and diarrhetic. "So that's what he thinks of 
me!" Ralph said. And he stopped feeling anything except his 
stomach. 



As sometimes happens, the diarrhea served to relieve 
the bellyache, almost as well as intercourse did, so Ralph took 
to drinking coffee quite regularly. Not as a substitute for 
intercourse, but as interim treatment, or occasionally as a 
labor-saving device. Nonetheless his intercourse record remained 
impressive. At least it impressed Jeanette. 

"I never guessed you were such a brute," she said with 
a grand smile. 

"Brute?" said Ralph, startled. 

"I'm proud of you," Jeanette said. "We have a little nest 
here," she said, glancing around the basement, "an island in a 
sea of effeteness. Everywhere the difference in the sexes is 
diminishing as we learn to emulate the machines, but not here. 
Oh boy, not here! " 

Once again Ralph was choking on a compliment. 
"Brute?" he said. It stuck in his craw. 

"Oh yes," she said. "Oh, when I think of how you 
took me, how you were staring at my breasts! They are nice, 
aren't they. And so's my tail, isn't it." 

Ralph would have none of it, so he told her about his 
bellyache. 

"You sonofabitch!" she cried. "You took me for a 
ppysic!" 

She socked him one and stormed out. 

It was four days before she came back. When Ralph 
answered the knock on the door she was standing there in the 
sunlight, sputtering. "I came to tell you I'm never going to bed 
with you again," she said. 

Ralph did not behave foolishly this time, so in a few 
minutes they were back at it, busy as otters sliding down a rock. 

Perhaps it had been the sudden and complete lack of 
her, the unexpected darkness of her absence ("She's all I have," 
he surprised himself thinking), but whatever it was, when he 
found he hadn't lost her he lost himself in her. You may say 
those are the only choices, but Ralph didn't. It didn't occur to 
him. He simply did it. To such effect that he didn't even hear 
the sounds they made any more, much less take invidious notice 
of the foreign taste of her mouth. He just dove in. 

People began to notice Jeanette's complacent smile. 
And Ralph's hurrying home at odd hours. She was almost always 
there, waiting. "I'm going home" is getting to be a euphemism, 
Ralph thought. 

When Jeanette heard his footsteps on the walk that led to 
the back door, she began flinging off her clothes. By the time he 
unlocked the door and came in, she was lying naked on top of 
the bed, kicking her legs in the air. It was very exciting. 

"Let's hope it isn't the meter-reader one day," Ralph 
said. 

"He doesn't have a key, silly," said Jeanette, giggling. 

But the landlord did, and one day inadvertently used 
it. Jeanette gobbled him up before he could say "Oof." 

Ralph was asked to move, but that only simplified 
things. Jeanette found a much better place, for two. "We'll 
save money," she said. Ralph was charmed. Especially when 
she showed up with a Woolworth wedding-band. "Musn't 
epater the bourgeoisie," she said. Ralph wasn't fooled, any 
more than he was when it turned out that she could cook. 

Thus they settled down in earnest to play house. 



The results were real, and far-reaching. Of the far- 
reaching you know because you've seen the announcement of 
marriage, and marriage is about as far-reaching as a thing of 
this kind can get. Of the real you have perhaps yet to hear. 

For immediate example, the all-consuming affair not 
only removed his bellyache but his other problems as well. 
Simply by removing his presence, one can suppose. There are 
times when our problems ask nothing better from us than our 
profound inattention. For Ralph this was such a time. It 



KPFA FOLIO.. .MARCH 1970 



35 



operated to keep him from the vicinity during the period of 
Dr. Mackenstein's lava flow, eventually leaving him exposed 
only to the remnant gases. And because he was not thinking 
of his problem with Mac, he had no opportunity of making 
things worse. So little was he thinking of it, in fact, that when 
next he crossed paths with him on the campus he said "Hello, 
Mac," quite as before, forgetting for a moment. Dr. Mackenstein 
snorted, but it was the snort of the mollified beast stamping 
"Accepted" on the token of submission offered by the other 
one on the path. In the jungle lives are saved this way every 
day, especially if the animal wishing to submit has about him, 
or can muster up, an air of abstracted innocence. Ralph had it. 
He looked innocent as a babe. Not to Dr. Mackenstein perhaps, 
but neither did he look as if he were going to vomit, so they 
passed without clash. "Your orals are two weeks from Friday," 
Dr. Mackenstein said. Ralph didn't even chortle at the phrase. 

Jeanette did. "Boy, if he only knew," she said. She 
was getting to be quite a little phrasemaker. And flunking all 
her courses. "Might as well simplify life," she said. "How often 
does one get the chance?" 

She helped Ralph study for his exams. Naturally. 
But unnaturally she went so far as to play a bit of the Lysistrata 
with him. Whether it was abstinence from her or from thinking 
that made his head grow fonder Ralph didn't know, but he had 
never felt so sharp. Which was just as well because Dr. Macken- 
stein had some real stinkers (his own word) prepared for him on 
examination day, most noticeably in the fields of phonics, 
method, linguistics, and acoustics. Ralph didn't even smell them. 
He went through it like a fresh breeze, so brilliantly as to give 
the entire examining committee a bellyache. When it was over 



one of the examiners, perhaps feeling that his congratulatory 
smile wasn't quite up to its job, shook Ralph's hand and said 
"Brilliant, my boy. Brilliant indeed." That done, he felt entitled 
to a little belch of rebuke. "You understand, Ralph, it has 
occurred to us to miss your presence here of late. What have you 
been doing?" 

"Screwing my head off," Ralph said. 

His sense of accuracy had returned. 

Also the brighter face of coincidence, since the 
examiner proved one of those who could believe he meant 
studying. He was perfectly convinced that the English are 
full of such usages. 

Ralph followed up this triumph with yet another in 
the written examinations. Here an automatic increase in 
brilliance of effect was provided by the circumstance of 
questions not aimed at Ralph alone. And here too his birthright 
served him. Being English, he could write it. 

Emerging from the final examination Ralph sought a 
shady patch of grass, and there fed further problems to his 
exultant wits. In no time at all they disposed of Mac and Ginny, 
the Speech Department, the doctor, the dogs, and several 
classic problems of sound and money. When he arose he was 
a candidate for the Ph. D. in Education and for marriage. 



To Be Continued ) 



POEMS BY ANTHONY ERNST 

who is an undergraduate at Davis, 
majoring in psychobiology. 



OBIT 

telepathy is when Baby's grown too big 
to sit in Mama's lap, 

which is Body English, 

which is the language of our dreams, 

unremembered, save for the nagging 
reminder of an itch. 



Member of the Wedding 

In this town 

people cry with their armpits - 

I don't think they have 
natural human hearts - 

there's something bestial 
about their sorrow, 

as if they'd pushed 
away the hurt 

somehow for enough inside 

so that they simply cannot understand. 

A friend once asked me if I'd ever cried. 

I once knew a man named Howard 
who had been to the State Hospital - 

he said it wasn't too bad there; only, 
the electrical shocks, 

sometimes they confused him - 

and, well... standing there, 

with his big tummy and suspenders, 

suddenly he didn't have his beautiful 
sad smile anymore. 

And I was crying (all of a sudden) 
because I knew he couldn't cry. 



36 



KPFA FOLIO. ..MARCH 1970 



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